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Type I interferons for induction of remission in ulcerative colitis.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015; (9):CD006790CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines which possess immunoregulatory properties and have been used to successfully treat a number of chronic inflammatory disorders. It has been postulated that Type I IFNs may be able to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2 predominant diseases like ulcerative colitis.

OBJECTIVES

To systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of type I IFN therapy for induction of remission in ulcerative colitis.

SEARCH METHODS

We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, the Cochrane IBD/FBD group specialised register, and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception to August 8, 2014. Reference lists of trials and review articles, as well as recent proceedings from major gastroenterology meetings were manually searched.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Randomised controlled trials of type I IFNs for induction of remission in UC were included. The study population included patients of any age with active ulcerative colitis. There were no exclusions based on type, dose or duration of IFN treatment.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Two independent authors reviewed studies for eligibility, extracted the data and assessed study quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcomes was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. The primary outcome was induction of remission of ulcerative colitis. Secondary outcomes included: time to remission, mean change in disease activity index score, clinical, histological or endoscopic improvement, improvement in quality of life, and adverse events. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We calculated the mean difference and corresponding 95% confidence interval for continuous outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3.5 software.

MAIN RESULTS

Six studies were eligible for inclusion (517 patients). Five studies compared type I IFNs to placebo injections (485 patients) and a single study compared IFNs to prednisolone enemas in patients with left-sided colitis (32 patients). The active comparator study was rated as high risk of bias due to an open-label design. Three studies were rated as unclear risk of bias for random sequence generation and allocation concealment. Two studies described as double blind were rated as unclear risk of bias for blinding. There was no significant benefit of type I IFNs over placebo for inducing clinical remission or improvement in patients with active ulcerative colitis. Thirty-six per cent (87/242) of patients in the type I IFNs group achieved clinical remission by 8 to 12 weeks compared to 30% (36/120) of placebo patients (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.58; 4 studies, 362 patients). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcome clinical remission was moderate due to sparse data (123 events). Fifty-six per cent (149/264) of patients in the type I IFNs group improved clinically by 8 to 12 weeks compared to 48% (77/161) of placebo patients (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.40; 4 studies, 425 patients). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcome clinical improvement was moderate due to sparse data (226 events). Patients who received type I IFNs were significantly more likely to withdraw from the studies due to adverse events than those who received placebo. Seven per cent (18/42) of type I IFNs patients withdrew due to adverse events compared to 2% (3/152) of placebo patients (RR 3.16, 95% CI 1.06 to 9.40). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcome withdrawal due to adverse events was low due to very sparse data (21 events). The study comparing type I IFNs to prednisolone enemas found no difference between the treatment groups in quality of life or disease activity scores. Common adverse events included headaches, arthralgias, myalgias, fatigue, back pain, nausea, application site reactions, rigors, and fevers. There were no statistically significant differences in the other secondary outcomes.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS

Moderate quality evidence suggests that type I IFNs are not effective for the induction of remission in UC. In addition, there are concerns regarding the tolerability of this class of treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Robarts Clinical Trials, Robarts Research Institute, P.O. Box 5015, 100 Perth Drive, London, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26368001

Citation

Wang, Yongjun, et al. "Type I Interferons for Induction of Remission in Ulcerative Colitis." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2015, p. CD006790.
Wang Y, MacDonald JK, Benchimol EI, et al. Type I interferons for induction of remission in ulcerative colitis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015.
Wang, Y., MacDonald, J. K., Benchimol, E. I., Griffiths, A. M., Steinhart, A. H., Panaccione, R., & Seow, C. H. (2015). Type I interferons for induction of remission in ulcerative colitis. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (9), p. CD006790. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD006790.pub3.
Wang Y, et al. Type I Interferons for Induction of Remission in Ulcerative Colitis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Sep 14;(9)CD006790. PubMed PMID: 26368001.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Type I interferons for induction of remission in ulcerative colitis. AU - Wang,Yongjun, AU - MacDonald,John K, AU - Benchimol,Eric I, AU - Griffiths,Anne Marie, AU - Steinhart,A Hillary, AU - Panaccione,Remo, AU - Seow,Cynthia H, Y1 - 2015/09/14/ PY - 2015/9/15/entrez PY - 2015/9/15/pubmed PY - 2016/4/1/medline SP - CD006790 EP - CD006790 JF - The Cochrane database of systematic reviews JO - Cochrane Database Syst Rev IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines which possess immunoregulatory properties and have been used to successfully treat a number of chronic inflammatory disorders. It has been postulated that Type I IFNs may be able to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2 predominant diseases like ulcerative colitis. OBJECTIVES: To systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of type I IFN therapy for induction of remission in ulcerative colitis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, the Cochrane IBD/FBD group specialised register, and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception to August 8, 2014. Reference lists of trials and review articles, as well as recent proceedings from major gastroenterology meetings were manually searched. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of type I IFNs for induction of remission in UC were included. The study population included patients of any age with active ulcerative colitis. There were no exclusions based on type, dose or duration of IFN treatment. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two independent authors reviewed studies for eligibility, extracted the data and assessed study quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcomes was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. The primary outcome was induction of remission of ulcerative colitis. Secondary outcomes included: time to remission, mean change in disease activity index score, clinical, histological or endoscopic improvement, improvement in quality of life, and adverse events. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We calculated the mean difference and corresponding 95% confidence interval for continuous outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3.5 software. MAIN RESULTS: Six studies were eligible for inclusion (517 patients). Five studies compared type I IFNs to placebo injections (485 patients) and a single study compared IFNs to prednisolone enemas in patients with left-sided colitis (32 patients). The active comparator study was rated as high risk of bias due to an open-label design. Three studies were rated as unclear risk of bias for random sequence generation and allocation concealment. Two studies described as double blind were rated as unclear risk of bias for blinding. There was no significant benefit of type I IFNs over placebo for inducing clinical remission or improvement in patients with active ulcerative colitis. Thirty-six per cent (87/242) of patients in the type I IFNs group achieved clinical remission by 8 to 12 weeks compared to 30% (36/120) of placebo patients (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.58; 4 studies, 362 patients). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcome clinical remission was moderate due to sparse data (123 events). Fifty-six per cent (149/264) of patients in the type I IFNs group improved clinically by 8 to 12 weeks compared to 48% (77/161) of placebo patients (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.40; 4 studies, 425 patients). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcome clinical improvement was moderate due to sparse data (226 events). Patients who received type I IFNs were significantly more likely to withdraw from the studies due to adverse events than those who received placebo. Seven per cent (18/42) of type I IFNs patients withdrew due to adverse events compared to 2% (3/152) of placebo patients (RR 3.16, 95% CI 1.06 to 9.40). A GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcome withdrawal due to adverse events was low due to very sparse data (21 events). The study comparing type I IFNs to prednisolone enemas found no difference between the treatment groups in quality of life or disease activity scores. Common adverse events included headaches, arthralgias, myalgias, fatigue, back pain, nausea, application site reactions, rigors, and fevers. There were no statistically significant differences in the other secondary outcomes. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Moderate quality evidence suggests that type I IFNs are not effective for the induction of remission in UC. In addition, there are concerns regarding the tolerability of this class of treatment. SN - 1469-493X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26368001/Type_I_interferons_for_induction_of_remission_in_ulcerative_colitis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD006790.pub3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -