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Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in patients with hematologic malignancy.
J Clin Virol. 2015 Oct; 71:51-8.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in hematologic malignancy (HM) patients. Predictors of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) including the impact of HRV species and types are poorly understood.

OBJECTIVES

This study aims to describe the clinical and molecular epidemiology of HRV infections among HM patients.

STUDY DESIGN

From April 2012-March 2013, HRV-positive respiratory specimens from symptomatic HM patients were molecularly characterized by analysis of partial viral protein 1 (VP1) or VP4 gene sequence. HRV LRTI risk-factors and outcomes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS

One hundred and ten HM patients presented with HRV URTI (n=78) and HRV LRTI (n=32). Hypoalbuminemia (OR 3.0; 95% CI, 1.0-9.2; p=0.05) was independently associated with LRTI, but other clinical and laboratory markers of host immunity did not differ between patients with URTI versus LRTI. Detection of bacterial co-pathogens was common in LRTI cases (25%). Among 92 typeable respiratory specimens, there were 58 (64%) HRV-As, 12 (13%) HRV-Bs, and 21 (23%) HRV-Cs, and one Enterovirus 68. LRTI rates among HRV-A (29%), HRV-B (17%), and HRV-C (29%) were similar. HRV-A infections occurred year-round while HRV-B and HRV-C infections clustered in the late fall and winter.

CONCLUSIONS

HRVs are associated with LRTI in HM patients. Illness severity is not attributable to specific HRV species or types. The frequent detection of bacterial co-pathogens in HRV LRTIs further substantiates the hypothesis that HRVs predispose to bacterial superinfection of the lower airways, similar to that of other community-acquired respiratory viruses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: sej9006@med.cornell.edu.Virology Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Virology Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26370315

Citation

Jacobs, Samantha E., et al. "Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinovirus Infections in Patients With Hematologic Malignancy." Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, vol. 71, 2015, pp. 51-8.
Jacobs SE, Lamson DM, Soave R, et al. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in patients with hematologic malignancy. J Clin Virol. 2015;71:51-8.
Jacobs, S. E., Lamson, D. M., Soave, R., Guzman, B. H., Shore, T. B., Ritchie, E. K., Zappetti, D., Satlin, M. J., Leonard, J. P., van Besien, K., Schuetz, A. N., Jenkins, S. G., George, K. S., & Walsh, T. J. (2015). Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in patients with hematologic malignancy. Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, 71, 51-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2015.07.309
Jacobs SE, et al. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinovirus Infections in Patients With Hematologic Malignancy. J Clin Virol. 2015;71:51-8. PubMed PMID: 26370315.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in patients with hematologic malignancy. AU - Jacobs,Samantha E, AU - Lamson,Daryl M, AU - Soave,Rosemary, AU - Guzman,Brigitte Huertas, AU - Shore,Tsiporah B, AU - Ritchie,Ellen K, AU - Zappetti,Dana, AU - Satlin,Michael J, AU - Leonard,John P, AU - van Besien,Koen, AU - Schuetz,Audrey N, AU - Jenkins,Stephen G, AU - George,Kirsten St, AU - Walsh,Thomas J, Y1 - 2015/07/29/ PY - 2015/03/20/received PY - 2015/07/22/revised PY - 2015/07/25/accepted PY - 2015/9/16/entrez PY - 2015/9/16/pubmed PY - 2016/6/1/medline KW - Hematologic malignancy KW - Human rhinovirus KW - Immunocompromised hosts KW - Rhinovirus species KW - Viral pneumonia SP - 51 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology JO - J Clin Virol VL - 71 N2 - BACKGROUND: Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in hematologic malignancy (HM) patients. Predictors of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) including the impact of HRV species and types are poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to describe the clinical and molecular epidemiology of HRV infections among HM patients. STUDY DESIGN: From April 2012-March 2013, HRV-positive respiratory specimens from symptomatic HM patients were molecularly characterized by analysis of partial viral protein 1 (VP1) or VP4 gene sequence. HRV LRTI risk-factors and outcomes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: One hundred and ten HM patients presented with HRV URTI (n=78) and HRV LRTI (n=32). Hypoalbuminemia (OR 3.0; 95% CI, 1.0-9.2; p=0.05) was independently associated with LRTI, but other clinical and laboratory markers of host immunity did not differ between patients with URTI versus LRTI. Detection of bacterial co-pathogens was common in LRTI cases (25%). Among 92 typeable respiratory specimens, there were 58 (64%) HRV-As, 12 (13%) HRV-Bs, and 21 (23%) HRV-Cs, and one Enterovirus 68. LRTI rates among HRV-A (29%), HRV-B (17%), and HRV-C (29%) were similar. HRV-A infections occurred year-round while HRV-B and HRV-C infections clustered in the late fall and winter. CONCLUSIONS: HRVs are associated with LRTI in HM patients. Illness severity is not attributable to specific HRV species or types. The frequent detection of bacterial co-pathogens in HRV LRTIs further substantiates the hypothesis that HRVs predispose to bacterial superinfection of the lower airways, similar to that of other community-acquired respiratory viruses. SN - 1873-5967 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26370315/Clinical_and_molecular_epidemiology_of_human_rhinovirus_infections_in_patients_with_hematologic_malignancy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1386-6532(15)00610-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -