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Body mass index, abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease.
Eur J Epidemiol 2015; 30(9):1009-19EJ

Abstract

Epidemiological studies have indicated a positive association between adiposity and gallbladder disease risk, however, the shape of the dose-response relationship and differences between overall and abdominal adiposity remains to be clarified. We conducted a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio and risk of gallbladder disease. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to January 9th 2015. Summary relative risks were calculated using a random effects model. Seventeen prospective studies of BMI and gallbladder disease risk with 55,670 cases among 1,921,103 participants were included. The summary relative risk (RR) for a 5 unit increment in BMI was 1.63 (95 % CI 1.49-1.78, I(2) = 98 %). There was evidence of a nonlinear association overall and among women, p(nonlinearity) < 0.0001, but not among men, p(nonlinearity) = 0.99, with a slight flattening of the curve at very high BMI levels (BMI 40-45), however, the risk of gallbladder disease increased almost twofold even within the "normal" BMI range. The summary RR for a 10 cm increase in waist circumference was 1.46 (95 % CI 1.24-1.72, I(2) = 98 %, n = 5) and for a 0.1 unit increment in waist-to-hip ratio was 1.44 (95 % CI 1.26-1.64, I(2) = 92 %, n = 4). Associations were attenuated, but still significant, when BMI and abdominal adiposity measures were mutually adjusted. Our results confirm a positive association between both general and abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease. There is an almost twofold increase in the risk even within the "normal" BMI range, suggesting that even moderate increases in BMI may increase risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. d.aune@imperial.ac.uk. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. d.aune@imperial.ac.uk.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK.Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26374741

Citation

Aune, Dagfinn, et al. "Body Mass Index, Abdominal Fatness and the Risk of Gallbladder Disease." European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 30, no. 9, 2015, pp. 1009-19.
Aune D, Norat T, Vatten LJ. Body mass index, abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015;30(9):1009-19.
Aune, D., Norat, T., & Vatten, L. J. (2015). Body mass index, abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease. European Journal of Epidemiology, 30(9), pp. 1009-19. doi:10.1007/s10654-015-0081-y.
Aune D, Norat T, Vatten LJ. Body Mass Index, Abdominal Fatness and the Risk of Gallbladder Disease. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015;30(9):1009-19. PubMed PMID: 26374741.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index, abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease. AU - Aune,Dagfinn, AU - Norat,Teresa, AU - Vatten,Lars J, Y1 - 2015/09/15/ PY - 2015/01/11/received PY - 2015/08/25/accepted PY - 2015/9/17/entrez PY - 2015/9/17/pubmed PY - 2016/1/9/medline KW - Body mass index KW - Cohort studies KW - Gallbladder disease KW - Gallstones KW - Meta-analysis KW - Systematic review KW - Waist circumference KW - Waist-to-hip ratio SP - 1009 EP - 19 JF - European journal of epidemiology JO - Eur. J. Epidemiol. VL - 30 IS - 9 N2 - Epidemiological studies have indicated a positive association between adiposity and gallbladder disease risk, however, the shape of the dose-response relationship and differences between overall and abdominal adiposity remains to be clarified. We conducted a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio and risk of gallbladder disease. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to January 9th 2015. Summary relative risks were calculated using a random effects model. Seventeen prospective studies of BMI and gallbladder disease risk with 55,670 cases among 1,921,103 participants were included. The summary relative risk (RR) for a 5 unit increment in BMI was 1.63 (95 % CI 1.49-1.78, I(2) = 98 %). There was evidence of a nonlinear association overall and among women, p(nonlinearity) < 0.0001, but not among men, p(nonlinearity) = 0.99, with a slight flattening of the curve at very high BMI levels (BMI 40-45), however, the risk of gallbladder disease increased almost twofold even within the "normal" BMI range. The summary RR for a 10 cm increase in waist circumference was 1.46 (95 % CI 1.24-1.72, I(2) = 98 %, n = 5) and for a 0.1 unit increment in waist-to-hip ratio was 1.44 (95 % CI 1.26-1.64, I(2) = 92 %, n = 4). Associations were attenuated, but still significant, when BMI and abdominal adiposity measures were mutually adjusted. Our results confirm a positive association between both general and abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease. There is an almost twofold increase in the risk even within the "normal" BMI range, suggesting that even moderate increases in BMI may increase risk. SN - 1573-7284 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26374741/Body_mass_index_abdominal_fatness_and_the_risk_of_gallbladder_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10654-015-0081-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -