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Nutrition: a key environmental dietary factor in clinical severity and cardio-metabolic risk in psoriatic male patients evaluated by 7-day food-frequency questionnaire.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Western dietary pattern is included among the environmental dietary factors involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Nutritional data collection methods and gender differences might affect the association between diet and psoriasis. The 7-day food records is considered the "gold standard" of self-administered food frequency questionnaires. In this study, we evaluated the differences in the dietary intake, anthropometric measurements and cardio-metabolic risk profile in a group of psoriatic patients compared with an age and Body Mass Index (BMI)-matched control group. In addition, in the group of psoriatic patients we investigated the association between the dietary intake and clinical severity of psoriasis.

METHODS

Cross-sectional case control observational study. A total of 82 adult males, 41 treatment-naïve patients with psoriasis and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and BMI were included in the study. The clinical severity of psoriasis was by assessed by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. The dietary interview data were collected by a 7-day food records. Anthropometric measures, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests and C-reactive protein levels were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HoMA-IR), Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI) and the Fatty Liver Index (FLI) were calculated.

RESULTS

Psoriatic patients consumed a higher percentage of total and simple carbohydrates, total fat, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio, and cholesterol, while the consumption of protein, complex carbohydrates, monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), n-3 PUFA and fiber was lower than in the control group. In addition, psoriatic patients presented altered anthropometric measurements, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests, and elevated values of HoMA-IR, VAI and FLI. PASI score well correlated with anthropometric measures, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests, cardio-metabolic indices, and the dietary components, except for protein and total carbohydrates. At logistic regression analysis between PASI score and MUFA, MetS presence was well predicted only by higher PASI score (OR = 1.794; p = 0.002; CI 1.242-2.591). At multiple regression analysis, MUFA was the best predictor of PASI score (r(2) = 0.387, β = -0.635, t = -5.127, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION

Differences in dietary intake were observed in adult male psoriatic patients compared with the controls. These differences were associated to the severity of the psoriasis and cardio-metabolic risk. FLI represented an early indicator of the cardio-metabolic risk profile in psoriatic patients, and dietary MUFA were major predictor of the clinical severity of psoriasis, while the association between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome appeared to be independent of MUFA intake. The low MUFA consumption might act as a possible adjunctive mechanism in increasing the inflammation milieu of psoriatic patients.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    I.O.S. & COLEMAN Srl, Naples, Italy. luigi.barrea@unina.it.

    ,

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. pmacchia@unina.it.

    ,

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. tarantin@unina.it. Centro Ricerche Oncologiche di Mercogliano, Istituto Nazionale per lo studio e la Cura Dei Tumori "Fondazione Giovanni Pascale", IRCCS, Mercogliano, Italy. tarantin@unina.it.

    ,

    IRCCS SDN, Napoli Via Gianturco 113, 80143, Naples, Italy. cdisomma@unina.it.

    ,

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. dott.ssapane@libero.it.

    ,

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. nicola.balato@unina.it.

    ,

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. maddy.napolitano@gmail.com.

    ,

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. colao@unina.it.

    Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Medical School of Naples, Federico II University, Via Sergio Pansini, 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. sisavast@unina.it.

    Source

    Journal of translational medicine 13: 2015 Sep 16 pg 303

    MeSH

    Adiposity
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Anthropometry
    Body Mass Index
    Case-Control Studies
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Data Collection
    Diet
    Fatty Liver
    Homeostasis
    Humans
    Insulin Resistance
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Nutritional Status
    Psoriasis
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Ultrasonography

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26376719

    Citation

    Barrea, Luigi, et al. "Nutrition: a Key Environmental Dietary Factor in Clinical Severity and Cardio-metabolic Risk in Psoriatic Male Patients Evaluated By 7-day Food-frequency Questionnaire." Journal of Translational Medicine, vol. 13, 2015, p. 303.
    Barrea L, Macchia PE, Tarantino G, et al. Nutrition: a key environmental dietary factor in clinical severity and cardio-metabolic risk in psoriatic male patients evaluated by 7-day food-frequency questionnaire. J Transl Med. 2015;13:303.
    Barrea, L., Macchia, P. E., Tarantino, G., Di Somma, C., Pane, E., Balato, N., ... Savastano, S. (2015). Nutrition: a key environmental dietary factor in clinical severity and cardio-metabolic risk in psoriatic male patients evaluated by 7-day food-frequency questionnaire. Journal of Translational Medicine, 13, p. 303. doi:10.1186/s12967-015-0658-y.
    Barrea L, et al. Nutrition: a Key Environmental Dietary Factor in Clinical Severity and Cardio-metabolic Risk in Psoriatic Male Patients Evaluated By 7-day Food-frequency Questionnaire. J Transl Med. 2015 Sep 16;13:303. PubMed PMID: 26376719.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition: a key environmental dietary factor in clinical severity and cardio-metabolic risk in psoriatic male patients evaluated by 7-day food-frequency questionnaire. AU - Barrea,Luigi, AU - Macchia,Paolo Emidio, AU - Tarantino,Giovanni, AU - Di Somma,Carolina, AU - Pane,Elena, AU - Balato,Nicola, AU - Napolitano,Maddalena, AU - Colao,Annamaria, AU - Savastano,Silvia, Y1 - 2015/09/16/ PY - 2015/03/30/received PY - 2015/09/01/accepted PY - 2015/9/18/entrez PY - 2015/9/18/pubmed PY - 2016/5/14/medline SP - 303 EP - 303 JF - Journal of translational medicine JO - J Transl Med VL - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Western dietary pattern is included among the environmental dietary factors involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Nutritional data collection methods and gender differences might affect the association between diet and psoriasis. The 7-day food records is considered the "gold standard" of self-administered food frequency questionnaires. In this study, we evaluated the differences in the dietary intake, anthropometric measurements and cardio-metabolic risk profile in a group of psoriatic patients compared with an age and Body Mass Index (BMI)-matched control group. In addition, in the group of psoriatic patients we investigated the association between the dietary intake and clinical severity of psoriasis. METHODS: Cross-sectional case control observational study. A total of 82 adult males, 41 treatment-naïve patients with psoriasis and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and BMI were included in the study. The clinical severity of psoriasis was by assessed by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. The dietary interview data were collected by a 7-day food records. Anthropometric measures, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests and C-reactive protein levels were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HoMA-IR), Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI) and the Fatty Liver Index (FLI) were calculated. RESULTS: Psoriatic patients consumed a higher percentage of total and simple carbohydrates, total fat, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio, and cholesterol, while the consumption of protein, complex carbohydrates, monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), n-3 PUFA and fiber was lower than in the control group. In addition, psoriatic patients presented altered anthropometric measurements, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests, and elevated values of HoMA-IR, VAI and FLI. PASI score well correlated with anthropometric measures, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests, cardio-metabolic indices, and the dietary components, except for protein and total carbohydrates. At logistic regression analysis between PASI score and MUFA, MetS presence was well predicted only by higher PASI score (OR = 1.794; p = 0.002; CI 1.242-2.591). At multiple regression analysis, MUFA was the best predictor of PASI score (r(2) = 0.387, β = -0.635, t = -5.127, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Differences in dietary intake were observed in adult male psoriatic patients compared with the controls. These differences were associated to the severity of the psoriasis and cardio-metabolic risk. FLI represented an early indicator of the cardio-metabolic risk profile in psoriatic patients, and dietary MUFA were major predictor of the clinical severity of psoriasis, while the association between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome appeared to be independent of MUFA intake. The low MUFA consumption might act as a possible adjunctive mechanism in increasing the inflammation milieu of psoriatic patients. SN - 1479-5876 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26376719/full_citation L2 - https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-015-0658-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -