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Intake and sources of added sugars among Australian children and adolescents.
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Dec; 55(8):2347-2355.EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine the intake and sources of added sugars (AS) of Australian children and adolescents, and compare their intake of free sugars (FS) to the recommended limit set by the World Health Organization (<10 % energy from FS).

METHOD

Data of 4140 children and adolescents aged 2-16 years with plausible intakes based on 2 × 24 h recalls from the 2007 Australian National Children Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used. AS content of foods was estimated based on a published method. Intakes of AS and FS, as well as food sources of AS, were calculated. One-way ANOVA was used for comparisons between age groups and gender.

RESULTS

The mean (SD) AS intake was 58.9 (35.1) g/day, representing 11.9 (5.6) % of daily energy intake and 46.9 (17.5) % of daily total sugars intake. More than 80 % of the subjects had % energy from FS > 10 %. Significant increasing trends for AS intake, % energy from AS, % energy from FS across age groups were observed. Sugar-sweetened beverages (19.6 %), cakes, biscuits, pastries and batter-based products (14.3 %), and sugar and sweet spreads (10.5 %) were the top three contributors of AS intake in the whole sample. Higher contribution of AS from sugar-sweetened beverages was observed in adolescents (p trend < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

A large proportion of Australian youths are consuming excessive amounts of energy from AS. Since the main sources of AS were energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, interventions which target the reduction in these foods would reduce energy and AS intake with minimal impact to core nutrient intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Molecular Bioscience and Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. jimmy.louie@sydney.edu.au.School of Medicine, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, The University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia.School of Molecular Bioscience and Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26377592

Citation

Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu, et al. "Intake and Sources of Added Sugars Among Australian Children and Adolescents." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 8, 2016, pp. 2347-2355.
Louie JC, Moshtaghian H, Rangan AM, et al. Intake and sources of added sugars among Australian children and adolescents. Eur J Nutr. 2016;55(8):2347-2355.
Louie, J. C., Moshtaghian, H., Rangan, A. M., Flood, V. M., & Gill, T. P. (2016). Intake and sources of added sugars among Australian children and adolescents. European Journal of Nutrition, 55(8), 2347-2355.
Louie JC, et al. Intake and Sources of Added Sugars Among Australian Children and Adolescents. Eur J Nutr. 2016;55(8):2347-2355. PubMed PMID: 26377592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake and sources of added sugars among Australian children and adolescents. AU - Louie,Jimmy Chun Yu, AU - Moshtaghian,Hanieh, AU - Rangan,Anna M, AU - Flood,Victoria M, AU - Gill,Timothy P, Y1 - 2015/09/16/ PY - 2015/06/01/received PY - 2015/09/10/accepted PY - 2015/9/18/pubmed PY - 2017/4/11/medline PY - 2015/9/18/entrez KW - Added sugars KW - Adolescents KW - Australian KW - Children KW - Food sources KW - Free sugars SP - 2347 EP - 2355 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 55 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine the intake and sources of added sugars (AS) of Australian children and adolescents, and compare their intake of free sugars (FS) to the recommended limit set by the World Health Organization (<10 % energy from FS). METHOD: Data of 4140 children and adolescents aged 2-16 years with plausible intakes based on 2 × 24 h recalls from the 2007 Australian National Children Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used. AS content of foods was estimated based on a published method. Intakes of AS and FS, as well as food sources of AS, were calculated. One-way ANOVA was used for comparisons between age groups and gender. RESULTS: The mean (SD) AS intake was 58.9 (35.1) g/day, representing 11.9 (5.6) % of daily energy intake and 46.9 (17.5) % of daily total sugars intake. More than 80 % of the subjects had % energy from FS > 10 %. Significant increasing trends for AS intake, % energy from AS, % energy from FS across age groups were observed. Sugar-sweetened beverages (19.6 %), cakes, biscuits, pastries and batter-based products (14.3 %), and sugar and sweet spreads (10.5 %) were the top three contributors of AS intake in the whole sample. Higher contribution of AS from sugar-sweetened beverages was observed in adolescents (p trend < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of Australian youths are consuming excessive amounts of energy from AS. Since the main sources of AS were energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, interventions which target the reduction in these foods would reduce energy and AS intake with minimal impact to core nutrient intake. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26377592/Intake_and_sources_of_added_sugars_among_Australian_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1041-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -