Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

High Amylose Starch with Low In Vitro Digestibility Stimulates Hindgut Fermentation and Has a Bifidogenic Effect in Weaned Pigs.
J Nutr. 2015 Nov; 145(11):2464-70.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dietary amylose resists enzymatic digestion, thereby providing a substrate for microbial fermentation that stimulates proliferation of beneficial microbiota and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the large intestine of pigs and humans. However, the effect of increasing dietary amylose in pigs immediately postweaning on growth, nutrient digestibility and flow, and intestinal microbial and SCFA profiles has not been studied and can be used as a model for newly weaned human infants.

OBJECTIVE

We studied the effects of increasing dietary amylose on growth, nutrient digestibility, and intestinal microbial and metabolite profiles in weaned pigs.

METHODS

Weaned pigs (n = 32) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 diets containing 67% starch with 0%, 20%, 28%, or 63% amylose for 21 d. Subsequently, pigs were killed to collect feces and digesta for measuring starch digestion and microbial and metabolite profiles.

RESULTS

Feeding weaned pigs 63% compared with 0%, 20%, and 28% amylose decreased (P < 0.05) feed intake by 5% and growth by ≥ 12%. Ileal digestibility of dry matter decreased (P < 0.05) by 10% and starch by 9%, thereby increasing (P < 0.05) hindgut fermentation, cecal and colonic total SCFAs, and colonic Bacteroides, and lowering (P < 0.01) ileal, cecal, and colonic pH in pigs consuming 63% compared with 0%, 20%, and 28% amylose. Cecal and colonic Bifidobacteria spp. increased by 14-30% (P < 0.05) and Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa were decreased (P < 0.01) in pigs consuming 63% compared with 0%, 20%, and 28% amylose.

CONCLUSION

Increasing dietary amylose in pigs immediately postweaning stimulated hindgut fermentation and Bifidobacteria spp., thereby manipulating the gut environment, but also reduced intake and growth. An optimum dietary amylose concentration should be determined, which would maintain desired growth rate and gut environment in weaned pigs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and.University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and.University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and.North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and ruurd.zijlstra@ualberta.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26377761

Citation

Fouhse, Janelle M., et al. "High Amylose Starch With Low in Vitro Digestibility Stimulates Hindgut Fermentation and Has a Bifidogenic Effect in Weaned Pigs." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 11, 2015, pp. 2464-70.
Fouhse JM, Gänzle MG, Regmi PR, et al. High Amylose Starch with Low In Vitro Digestibility Stimulates Hindgut Fermentation and Has a Bifidogenic Effect in Weaned Pigs. J Nutr. 2015;145(11):2464-70.
Fouhse, J. M., Gänzle, M. G., Regmi, P. R., van Kempen, T. A., & Zijlstra, R. T. (2015). High Amylose Starch with Low In Vitro Digestibility Stimulates Hindgut Fermentation and Has a Bifidogenic Effect in Weaned Pigs. The Journal of Nutrition, 145(11), 2464-70. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.115.214353
Fouhse JM, et al. High Amylose Starch With Low in Vitro Digestibility Stimulates Hindgut Fermentation and Has a Bifidogenic Effect in Weaned Pigs. J Nutr. 2015;145(11):2464-70. PubMed PMID: 26377761.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High Amylose Starch with Low In Vitro Digestibility Stimulates Hindgut Fermentation and Has a Bifidogenic Effect in Weaned Pigs. AU - Fouhse,Janelle M, AU - Gänzle,Michael G, AU - Regmi,Prajwal R, AU - van Kempen,Theo A T G, AU - Zijlstra,Ruurd T, Y1 - 2015/09/16/ PY - 2015/03/24/received PY - 2015/08/06/accepted PY - 2015/9/18/entrez PY - 2015/9/18/pubmed PY - 2016/2/13/medline KW - SCFA KW - amylose KW - bacteria KW - growth KW - pig KW - starch SP - 2464 EP - 70 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 145 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dietary amylose resists enzymatic digestion, thereby providing a substrate for microbial fermentation that stimulates proliferation of beneficial microbiota and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the large intestine of pigs and humans. However, the effect of increasing dietary amylose in pigs immediately postweaning on growth, nutrient digestibility and flow, and intestinal microbial and SCFA profiles has not been studied and can be used as a model for newly weaned human infants. OBJECTIVE: We studied the effects of increasing dietary amylose on growth, nutrient digestibility, and intestinal microbial and metabolite profiles in weaned pigs. METHODS: Weaned pigs (n = 32) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 diets containing 67% starch with 0%, 20%, 28%, or 63% amylose for 21 d. Subsequently, pigs were killed to collect feces and digesta for measuring starch digestion and microbial and metabolite profiles. RESULTS: Feeding weaned pigs 63% compared with 0%, 20%, and 28% amylose decreased (P < 0.05) feed intake by 5% and growth by ≥ 12%. Ileal digestibility of dry matter decreased (P < 0.05) by 10% and starch by 9%, thereby increasing (P < 0.05) hindgut fermentation, cecal and colonic total SCFAs, and colonic Bacteroides, and lowering (P < 0.01) ileal, cecal, and colonic pH in pigs consuming 63% compared with 0%, 20%, and 28% amylose. Cecal and colonic Bifidobacteria spp. increased by 14-30% (P < 0.05) and Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa were decreased (P < 0.01) in pigs consuming 63% compared with 0%, 20%, and 28% amylose. CONCLUSION: Increasing dietary amylose in pigs immediately postweaning stimulated hindgut fermentation and Bifidobacteria spp., thereby manipulating the gut environment, but also reduced intake and growth. An optimum dietary amylose concentration should be determined, which would maintain desired growth rate and gut environment in weaned pigs. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26377761/High_Amylose_Starch_with_Low_In_Vitro_Digestibility_Stimulates_Hindgut_Fermentation_and_Has_a_Bifidogenic_Effect_in_Weaned_Pigs_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.115.214353 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -