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Lymphangiomatous Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Clinicopathologic Study and Comparison Between Adults and Children.
Am J Clin Pathol 2015; 144(4):563-9AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Lymphangiomatous lesions involving the gastrointestinal (GI) tract remain incompletely characterized, and their clinical and histopathologic features have not been systematically evaluated. The distinction between a primary lymphatic malformation (lymphangioma) and a dilation of existing lymphatics (lymphangiectasia) is of clinical significance, since lymphangiectasia may occur in the setting of lymphatic obstruction due to an unsampled malignancy. We describe clinical and morphologic features of lymphangiomas of the GI tract in adult and pediatric populations and contrast them with lymphangiectasia.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective review of adult and pediatric lymphangiomas and lymphangiectasia involving the GI tract.

RESULTS

Thirty-six cases of lymphangioma and lymphangiectasia were retrieved, and clinical presentation and histologic features were compared. Lymphangiomas had distinct clinical presentations in adults and children, with adult lesions being more frequently asymptomatic and more frequently involving the superficial mucosal layers of the GI tract. Microscopically, lymphangiomas mostly consisted of confluent dilated spaces with a smooth muscle component. This appearance differed from lymphangiectasia, which lacked a complete distinct endothelial or smooth muscle lining and diffusely involved the mucosa and submucosa.

CONCLUSIONS

Morphologic features of GI tract lymphangiomas can be reliably distinguished from lymphangiectasia by clinical and pathologic characteristics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.From the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.From the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.From the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.From the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle. myeh@uw.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26386077

Citation

Lawless, Margaret E., et al. "Lymphangiomatous Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract: a Clinicopathologic Study and Comparison Between Adults and Children." American Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 144, no. 4, 2015, pp. 563-9.
Lawless ME, Lloyd KA, Swanson PE, et al. Lymphangiomatous Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Clinicopathologic Study and Comparison Between Adults and Children. Am J Clin Pathol. 2015;144(4):563-9.
Lawless, M. E., Lloyd, K. A., Swanson, P. E., Upton, M. P., & Yeh, M. M. (2015). Lymphangiomatous Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Clinicopathologic Study and Comparison Between Adults and Children. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 144(4), pp. 563-9. doi:10.1309/AJCPO8TW6EMAJSRP.
Lawless ME, et al. Lymphangiomatous Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract: a Clinicopathologic Study and Comparison Between Adults and Children. Am J Clin Pathol. 2015;144(4):563-9. PubMed PMID: 26386077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lymphangiomatous Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Clinicopathologic Study and Comparison Between Adults and Children. AU - Lawless,Margaret E, AU - Lloyd,Kelly A, AU - Swanson,Paul E, AU - Upton,Melissa P, AU - Yeh,Matthew M, PY - 2015/9/20/entrez PY - 2015/9/20/pubmed PY - 2015/12/22/medline KW - Adults KW - Children KW - Gastrointestinal tract KW - Lymphangiectasia KW - Lymphangioma SP - 563 EP - 9 JF - American journal of clinical pathology JO - Am. J. Clin. Pathol. VL - 144 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Lymphangiomatous lesions involving the gastrointestinal (GI) tract remain incompletely characterized, and their clinical and histopathologic features have not been systematically evaluated. The distinction between a primary lymphatic malformation (lymphangioma) and a dilation of existing lymphatics (lymphangiectasia) is of clinical significance, since lymphangiectasia may occur in the setting of lymphatic obstruction due to an unsampled malignancy. We describe clinical and morphologic features of lymphangiomas of the GI tract in adult and pediatric populations and contrast them with lymphangiectasia. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of adult and pediatric lymphangiomas and lymphangiectasia involving the GI tract. RESULTS: Thirty-six cases of lymphangioma and lymphangiectasia were retrieved, and clinical presentation and histologic features were compared. Lymphangiomas had distinct clinical presentations in adults and children, with adult lesions being more frequently asymptomatic and more frequently involving the superficial mucosal layers of the GI tract. Microscopically, lymphangiomas mostly consisted of confluent dilated spaces with a smooth muscle component. This appearance differed from lymphangiectasia, which lacked a complete distinct endothelial or smooth muscle lining and diffusely involved the mucosa and submucosa. CONCLUSIONS: Morphologic features of GI tract lymphangiomas can be reliably distinguished from lymphangiectasia by clinical and pathologic characteristics. SN - 1943-7722 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26386077/Lymphangiomatous_Lesions_of_the_Gastrointestinal_Tract:_A_Clinicopathologic_Study_and_Comparison_Between_Adults_and_Children_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcp/article-lookup/doi/10.1309/AJCPO8TW6EMAJSRP DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -