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Active and passive cigarette smoking and mortality among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.
Ann Epidemiol. 2015 Nov; 25(11):824-31.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Women who smoke at breast cancer diagnosis have higher risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality than nonsmokers; however, differences by ethnicity or prognostic factors and risk for noncancer mortality have not been evaluated.

METHODS

We examined associations of active and passive smoke exposure with mortality among Hispanic (n = 1020) and non-Hispanic white (n = 1198) women with invasive breast cancer in the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study (median follow-up of 10.6 years).

RESULTS

Risk of breast cancer-specific (HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.11-2.16) and all-cause (HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.30-2.17) mortality was increased for current smokers, with similar results stratified by ethnicity. Ever smokers had an increased risk of noncancer mortality (HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.12-2.51). Associations were strongest for current smokers who smoked for 20 years or more were postmenopausal, overweight and/or obese, or reported moderate and/or high alcohol consumption; however, interactions were not significant. Breast cancer-specific mortality was increased two fold for moderate and/or high recent passive smoke exposure among never smokers (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.24-3.63).

CONCLUSIONS

Findings support associations of active-smoking and passive-smoking diagnosis with risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality and ever smoking with noncancer mortality, regardless of ethnicity, and other factors. Smoking is a modifiable lifestyle factor and effective smoking cessation, and maintenance programs should be routinely recommended for women with breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, School of Public Health & Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY. Electronic address: stephanie.boone@louisville.edu.Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, School of Public Health & Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, School of Public Health & Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, School of Public Health & Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont; Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy, and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.H. Lee Moffit Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL.Department of Biology, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs.Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, School of Public Health & Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.Department of Medicine-Oncology and Hematology, School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, School of Public Health & Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26387598

Citation

Boone, Stephanie D., et al. "Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking and Mortality Among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White Women Diagnosed With Invasive Breast Cancer." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 11, 2015, pp. 824-31.
Boone SD, Baumgartner KB, Baumgartner RN, et al. Active and passive cigarette smoking and mortality among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Ann Epidemiol. 2015;25(11):824-31.
Boone, S. D., Baumgartner, K. B., Baumgartner, R. N., Connor, A. E., John, E. M., Giuliano, A. R., Hines, L. M., Rai, S. N., Riley, E. C., Pinkston, C. M., Wolff, R. K., & Slattery, M. L. (2015). Active and passive cigarette smoking and mortality among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Annals of Epidemiology, 25(11), 824-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.08.007
Boone SD, et al. Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking and Mortality Among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White Women Diagnosed With Invasive Breast Cancer. Ann Epidemiol. 2015;25(11):824-31. PubMed PMID: 26387598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Active and passive cigarette smoking and mortality among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. AU - Boone,Stephanie D, AU - Baumgartner,Kathy B, AU - Baumgartner,Richard N, AU - Connor,Avonne E, AU - John,Esther M, AU - Giuliano,Anna R, AU - Hines,Lisa M, AU - Rai,Shesh N, AU - Riley,Elizabeth C, AU - Pinkston,Christina M, AU - Wolff,Roger K, AU - Slattery,Martha L, Y1 - 2015/08/28/ PY - 2015/05/05/received PY - 2015/08/06/revised PY - 2015/08/17/accepted PY - 2015/9/22/entrez PY - 2015/9/22/pubmed PY - 2016/5/24/medline KW - Breast cancer KW - Ethnicity KW - Hispanic KW - Mortality KW - Native American ancestry KW - Smoking KW - Survival SP - 824 EP - 31 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 25 IS - 11 N2 - PURPOSE: Women who smoke at breast cancer diagnosis have higher risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality than nonsmokers; however, differences by ethnicity or prognostic factors and risk for noncancer mortality have not been evaluated. METHODS: We examined associations of active and passive smoke exposure with mortality among Hispanic (n = 1020) and non-Hispanic white (n = 1198) women with invasive breast cancer in the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study (median follow-up of 10.6 years). RESULTS: Risk of breast cancer-specific (HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.11-2.16) and all-cause (HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.30-2.17) mortality was increased for current smokers, with similar results stratified by ethnicity. Ever smokers had an increased risk of noncancer mortality (HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.12-2.51). Associations were strongest for current smokers who smoked for 20 years or more were postmenopausal, overweight and/or obese, or reported moderate and/or high alcohol consumption; however, interactions were not significant. Breast cancer-specific mortality was increased two fold for moderate and/or high recent passive smoke exposure among never smokers (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.24-3.63). CONCLUSIONS: Findings support associations of active-smoking and passive-smoking diagnosis with risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality and ever smoking with noncancer mortality, regardless of ethnicity, and other factors. Smoking is a modifiable lifestyle factor and effective smoking cessation, and maintenance programs should be routinely recommended for women with breast cancer. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26387598/Active_and_passive_cigarette_smoking_and_mortality_among_Hispanic_and_non_Hispanic_white_women_diagnosed_with_invasive_breast_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(15)00376-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -