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An investigation of PTSD's core dimensions and relations with anxiety and depression.
Psychol Trauma 2016; 8(2):214-7PT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly comorbid with anxiety and depressive disorders, which is suggestive of shared variance or common underlying dimensions. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the latent factors of PTSD with the constructs of anxiety and depression in order to increase understanding of the co-occurrence of these disorders.

METHOD

Data were collected from a nonclinical sample of 186 trauma-exposed participants using the PTSD Checklist and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to determine model fit comparing 3 PTSD factor structure models, followed by Wald tests comparing the relationships between PTSD factors and the core dimensions of anxiety and depression.

RESULTS

In model comparisons, the 5-factor dysphoric arousal model of PTSD provided the best fit for the data, compared to the emotional numbing and dysphoria models of PTSD. Compared to anxious arousal, the dysphoric arousal and numbing factors of PTSD were more related to depression severity. Numbing, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal were not differentially related to the latent anxiety factor.

CONCLUSIONS

The underlying factors of PTSD contain aspects of the core dimensions of both anxiety and depression. The heterogeneity of PTSD's associations with anxiety and depressive constructs requires additional empirical exploration because clarification regarding these relationships will impact diagnostic classification as well as clinical practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology.Department of Psychology.Department of Psychiatry.School of Psychology.Department of Psychology.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26390113

Citation

Byllesby, Brianna M., et al. "An Investigation of PTSD's Core Dimensions and Relations With Anxiety and Depression." Psychological Trauma : Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, vol. 8, no. 2, 2016, pp. 214-7.
Byllesby BM, Durham TA, Forbes D, et al. An investigation of PTSD's core dimensions and relations with anxiety and depression. Psychol Trauma. 2016;8(2):214-7.
Byllesby, B. M., Durham, T. A., Forbes, D., Armour, C., & Elhai, J. D. (2016). An investigation of PTSD's core dimensions and relations with anxiety and depression. Psychological Trauma : Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 8(2), pp. 214-7. doi:10.1037/tra0000081.
Byllesby BM, et al. An Investigation of PTSD's Core Dimensions and Relations With Anxiety and Depression. Psychol Trauma. 2016;8(2):214-7. PubMed PMID: 26390113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An investigation of PTSD's core dimensions and relations with anxiety and depression. AU - Byllesby,Brianna M, AU - Durham,Tory A, AU - Forbes,David, AU - Armour,Cherie, AU - Elhai,Jon D, Y1 - 2015/09/21/ PY - 2015/9/22/entrez PY - 2015/9/22/pubmed PY - 2017/1/5/medline SP - 214 EP - 7 JF - Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy JO - Psychol Trauma VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly comorbid with anxiety and depressive disorders, which is suggestive of shared variance or common underlying dimensions. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the latent factors of PTSD with the constructs of anxiety and depression in order to increase understanding of the co-occurrence of these disorders. METHOD: Data were collected from a nonclinical sample of 186 trauma-exposed participants using the PTSD Checklist and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to determine model fit comparing 3 PTSD factor structure models, followed by Wald tests comparing the relationships between PTSD factors and the core dimensions of anxiety and depression. RESULTS: In model comparisons, the 5-factor dysphoric arousal model of PTSD provided the best fit for the data, compared to the emotional numbing and dysphoria models of PTSD. Compared to anxious arousal, the dysphoric arousal and numbing factors of PTSD were more related to depression severity. Numbing, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal were not differentially related to the latent anxiety factor. CONCLUSIONS: The underlying factors of PTSD contain aspects of the core dimensions of both anxiety and depression. The heterogeneity of PTSD's associations with anxiety and depressive constructs requires additional empirical exploration because clarification regarding these relationships will impact diagnostic classification as well as clinical practice. SN - 1942-969X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26390113/An_investigation_of_PTSD's_core_dimensions_and_relations_with_anxiety_and_depression_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/tra/8/2/214 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -