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Counseling services for Asian, Latino/a, and White American students: Initial severity, session attendance, and outcome.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016 07; 22(3):299-310.CD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The current study examined racial/ethnic differences in initial severity, session attendance, and counseling outcomes in a large and diverse sample of Asian American, Latino/a, and White student clients who utilized university counseling services between 2008 and 2012.

METHOD

We used archival data of 5,472 clients (62% female; M age = 23.1, SD = 4.3) who self-identified their race/ethnicity as being Asian American (38.9%), Latino/a (14.9%), or White (46.2%). Treatment engagement was measured by the number of counseling sessions attended; initial severity and treatment outcome were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.

RESULTS

Asian American clients, particularly Chinese, Filipino/a, Korean, and Vietnamese Americans, had greater initial severity compared with White clients. Asian Indian, Korean, and Vietnamese American clients used significantly fewer sessions of counseling than White clients after controlling for initial severity. All racial/ethnic minority groups continued to have clinically significant distress in certain areas (e.g., social role functioning) at counseling termination.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings highlight the need to devote greater attention to the counseling experiences of racial/ethnic minority clients, especially certain Asian American groups. Further research directions are provided. (PsycINFO Database Record

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco.Counseling and Psychological Services, University of California, San Diego.Counseling Center, University of California, Irvine.Department of Graduate Psychology, Azusa Pacific University.Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26390372

Citation

Kim, Jin E., et al. "Counseling Services for Asian, Latino/a, and White American Students: Initial Severity, Session Attendance, and Outcome." Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, vol. 22, no. 3, 2016, pp. 299-310.
Kim JE, Park SS, La A, et al. Counseling services for Asian, Latino/a, and White American students: Initial severity, session attendance, and outcome. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016;22(3):299-310.
Kim, J. E., Park, S. S., La, A., Chang, J., & Zane, N. (2016). Counseling services for Asian, Latino/a, and White American students: Initial severity, session attendance, and outcome. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 22(3), 299-310. https://doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000069
Kim JE, et al. Counseling Services for Asian, Latino/a, and White American Students: Initial Severity, Session Attendance, and Outcome. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016;22(3):299-310. PubMed PMID: 26390372.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Counseling services for Asian, Latino/a, and White American students: Initial severity, session attendance, and outcome. AU - Kim,Jin E, AU - Park,Samuel S, AU - La,Amy, AU - Chang,Jenss, AU - Zane,Nolan, Y1 - 2015/09/21/ PY - 2015/9/22/entrez PY - 2015/9/22/pubmed PY - 2018/1/24/medline SP - 299 EP - 310 JF - Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology JO - Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The current study examined racial/ethnic differences in initial severity, session attendance, and counseling outcomes in a large and diverse sample of Asian American, Latino/a, and White student clients who utilized university counseling services between 2008 and 2012. METHOD: We used archival data of 5,472 clients (62% female; M age = 23.1, SD = 4.3) who self-identified their race/ethnicity as being Asian American (38.9%), Latino/a (14.9%), or White (46.2%). Treatment engagement was measured by the number of counseling sessions attended; initial severity and treatment outcome were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire-45. RESULTS: Asian American clients, particularly Chinese, Filipino/a, Korean, and Vietnamese Americans, had greater initial severity compared with White clients. Asian Indian, Korean, and Vietnamese American clients used significantly fewer sessions of counseling than White clients after controlling for initial severity. All racial/ethnic minority groups continued to have clinically significant distress in certain areas (e.g., social role functioning) at counseling termination. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the need to devote greater attention to the counseling experiences of racial/ethnic minority clients, especially certain Asian American groups. Further research directions are provided. (PsycINFO Database Record SN - 1099-9809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26390372/Counseling_services_for_Asian_Latino/a_and_White_American_students:_Initial_severity_session_attendance_and_outcome_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/cdp/22/3/299 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -