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Association between Dietary Patterns and the Indicators of Obesity among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study.
Nutrients. 2015 Sep 17; 7(9):7995-8009.N

Abstract

No previous study has investigated dietary pattern in association with obesity risk in a middle-aged Chinese population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of obesity in the city of Hangzhou, the capital of Zhejiang Province, east China. In this cross-sectional study of 2560 subjects aged 45-60 years, dietary intakes were evaluated using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). All anthropometric measurements were obtained using standardized procedures. The partial correlation analysis was performed to assess the associations between dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist to hip ratio (WHR). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the associations between dietary patterns and obesity, with adjustment for potential confounders. Four major dietary patterns were extracted by means of factor analysis: animal food, traditional Chinese, western fast-food, and high-salt patterns. The animal food pattern was positively associated with BMI (r = 0.082, 0.144, respectively, p < 0.05) and WC (r = 0.102, 0.132, respectively, p < 0.01), and the traditional Chinese pattern was inversely associated with BMI (r = -0.047, -0.116, respectively, p < 0.05) and WC (r = -0.067, -0.113, respectively, p < 0.05) in both genders. After controlling for potential confounders, subjects in the highest quartile of animal food pattern scores had a greater odds ratio for abdominal obesity (odds ratio (OR) = 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.188-2.340; p < 0.01), in comparison to those from the lowest quartile. Compared with the lowest quartile of the traditional Chinese pattern, the highest quartile had a lower odds ratio for abdominal obesity (OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.441-0.901, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicated that the animal food pattern was associated with a higher risk of abdominal obesity, while the traditional Chinese pattern was associated with a lower risk of abdominal obesity. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. shulong19880920@126.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. kuaidou09@163.com. Department of Digestion, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. kuaidou09@163.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. zxy19740804@sina.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. xiaosi_32075001@126.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. xly2008hi@163.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. gaowei05715133@163.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. zhanglun306@163.com.Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Xihu district, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, China. liaodan0203@sina.com.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26393646

Citation

Shu, Long, et al. "Association Between Dietary Patterns and the Indicators of Obesity Among Chinese: a Cross-Sectional Study." Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 9, 2015, pp. 7995-8009.
Shu L, Zheng PF, Zhang XY, et al. Association between Dietary Patterns and the Indicators of Obesity among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients. 2015;7(9):7995-8009.
Shu, L., Zheng, P. F., Zhang, X. Y., Si, C. J., Yu, X. L., Gao, W., Zhang, L., & Liao, D. (2015). Association between Dietary Patterns and the Indicators of Obesity among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients, 7(9), 7995-8009. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7095376
Shu L, et al. Association Between Dietary Patterns and the Indicators of Obesity Among Chinese: a Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients. 2015 Sep 17;7(9):7995-8009. PubMed PMID: 26393646.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Dietary Patterns and the Indicators of Obesity among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study. AU - Shu,Long, AU - Zheng,Pei-Fen, AU - Zhang,Xiao-Yan, AU - Si,Cai-Juan, AU - Yu,Xiao-Long, AU - Gao,Wei, AU - Zhang,Lun, AU - Liao,Dan, Y1 - 2015/09/17/ PY - 2015/07/10/received PY - 2015/09/07/revised PY - 2015/09/11/accepted PY - 2015/9/23/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/6/30/medline KW - China KW - cross-sectional study KW - dietary patterns KW - factor analysis KW - obesity SP - 7995 EP - 8009 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 7 IS - 9 N2 - UNLABELLED: No previous study has investigated dietary pattern in association with obesity risk in a middle-aged Chinese population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of obesity in the city of Hangzhou, the capital of Zhejiang Province, east China. In this cross-sectional study of 2560 subjects aged 45-60 years, dietary intakes were evaluated using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). All anthropometric measurements were obtained using standardized procedures. The partial correlation analysis was performed to assess the associations between dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist to hip ratio (WHR). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the associations between dietary patterns and obesity, with adjustment for potential confounders. Four major dietary patterns were extracted by means of factor analysis: animal food, traditional Chinese, western fast-food, and high-salt patterns. The animal food pattern was positively associated with BMI (r = 0.082, 0.144, respectively, p < 0.05) and WC (r = 0.102, 0.132, respectively, p < 0.01), and the traditional Chinese pattern was inversely associated with BMI (r = -0.047, -0.116, respectively, p < 0.05) and WC (r = -0.067, -0.113, respectively, p < 0.05) in both genders. After controlling for potential confounders, subjects in the highest quartile of animal food pattern scores had a greater odds ratio for abdominal obesity (odds ratio (OR) = 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.188-2.340; p < 0.01), in comparison to those from the lowest quartile. Compared with the lowest quartile of the traditional Chinese pattern, the highest quartile had a lower odds ratio for abdominal obesity (OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.441-0.901, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicated that the animal food pattern was associated with a higher risk of abdominal obesity, while the traditional Chinese pattern was associated with a lower risk of abdominal obesity. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26393646/Association_between_Dietary_Patterns_and_the_Indicators_of_Obesity_among_Chinese:_A_Cross_Sectional_Study_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu7095376 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -