Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.
PLoS One. 2015; 10(9):e0138462.Plos

Abstract

AIMS

Although subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is effective in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), its physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Because STN-DBS is effective in patients with PD whose motor symptoms are dramatically alleviated by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, the higher preoperative catecholamine levels might be related to the better clinical outcome after surgery. We aimed to examine the correlation between the preoperative catecholamine levels and postoperative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The effectiveness of STN-DBS in the patient who responded well to dopaminergic medication suggest the causal link between the dopaminergic system and STN-DBS. We also examined how catecholamine levels were modulated after subthalamic stimulation.

METHODS

In total 25 patients with PD were enrolled (Mean age 66.2 ± 6.7 years, mean disease duration 11.6 ± 3.7 years). Mean levodopa equivalent doses were 1032 ± 34.6 mg before surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma catecholamine levels were measured an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs before surgery. The mean Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores (UPDRS) and the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) were obtained before and after surgery. Of the 25 patients, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were collected an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs during on stimulation at follow up in 11 patients.

RESULTS

Mean levodopa equivalent doses significantly decreased after surgery with improvement in motor functions and quality of life. The preoperative catecholamine levels had basically negative correlations with postoperative motor scores and quality of life, suggesting that higher preoperative catecholamine levels were related to better outcome after STN-DBS. The preoperative plasma levels of L-DOPA had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase three months after STN-DBS. The preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase one year after STN-DBS and the preoperative CSF homovanilic acid (HVA) levels had significant negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in on phase three months after STN-DBS. In PDQ-39 SI (summary index), preoperative plasma dopamine (DA) level had significantly negative correlations with postoperative PDQ-39 SI one year after STN-DBS suggesting that higher preoperative plasma DA level resulted in better quality of life (QOL) one year after STN-DBS. The stepwise multiple linear regression study revealed that higher preoperative plasma HVA levels had negative influence on the postoperative motor symptoms (i.e., increase in the score of UPDRS), whereas higher preoperative CSF L-DOPA levels had positive influence on the postoperative motor symptoms and QOL (decrease in the score of UPDRS and PDQ-39 SI) The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively in 11 patients despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. Unexpectedly, CSF HVA levels significantly increased from 0.00089±0.0003 ng/μl to 0.002±0.0008 ng/μl after STN-DBS.

CONCLUSION

The preoperative catecholamine levels might affect the postoperative motor symptoms and quality of life. The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan; Department of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical College, Tochigi, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26394059

Citation

Yamamoto, Tatsuya, et al. "Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels With Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome After Surgery in Patients With Parkinson's Disease." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 9, 2015, pp. e0138462.
Yamamoto T, Uchiyama T, Higuchi Y, et al. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson's Disease. PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138462.
Yamamoto, T., Uchiyama, T., Higuchi, Y., Asahina, M., Hirano, S., Yamanaka, Y., & Kuwabara, S. (2015). Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson's Disease. PloS One, 10(9), e0138462. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138462
Yamamoto T, et al. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels With Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome After Surgery in Patients With Parkinson's Disease. PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138462. PubMed PMID: 26394059.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson's Disease. AU - Yamamoto,Tatsuya, AU - Uchiyama,Tomoyuki, AU - Higuchi,Yoshinori, AU - Asahina,Masato, AU - Hirano,Shigeki, AU - Yamanaka,Yoshitaka, AU - Kuwabara,Satoshi, Y1 - 2015/09/22/ PY - 2015/07/11/received PY - 2015/08/31/accepted PY - 2015/9/23/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/6/4/medline SP - e0138462 EP - e0138462 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 10 IS - 9 N2 - AIMS: Although subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is effective in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), its physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Because STN-DBS is effective in patients with PD whose motor symptoms are dramatically alleviated by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, the higher preoperative catecholamine levels might be related to the better clinical outcome after surgery. We aimed to examine the correlation between the preoperative catecholamine levels and postoperative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The effectiveness of STN-DBS in the patient who responded well to dopaminergic medication suggest the causal link between the dopaminergic system and STN-DBS. We also examined how catecholamine levels were modulated after subthalamic stimulation. METHODS: In total 25 patients with PD were enrolled (Mean age 66.2 ± 6.7 years, mean disease duration 11.6 ± 3.7 years). Mean levodopa equivalent doses were 1032 ± 34.6 mg before surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma catecholamine levels were measured an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs before surgery. The mean Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores (UPDRS) and the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) were obtained before and after surgery. Of the 25 patients, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were collected an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs during on stimulation at follow up in 11 patients. RESULTS: Mean levodopa equivalent doses significantly decreased after surgery with improvement in motor functions and quality of life. The preoperative catecholamine levels had basically negative correlations with postoperative motor scores and quality of life, suggesting that higher preoperative catecholamine levels were related to better outcome after STN-DBS. The preoperative plasma levels of L-DOPA had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase three months after STN-DBS. The preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase one year after STN-DBS and the preoperative CSF homovanilic acid (HVA) levels had significant negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in on phase three months after STN-DBS. In PDQ-39 SI (summary index), preoperative plasma dopamine (DA) level had significantly negative correlations with postoperative PDQ-39 SI one year after STN-DBS suggesting that higher preoperative plasma DA level resulted in better quality of life (QOL) one year after STN-DBS. The stepwise multiple linear regression study revealed that higher preoperative plasma HVA levels had negative influence on the postoperative motor symptoms (i.e., increase in the score of UPDRS), whereas higher preoperative CSF L-DOPA levels had positive influence on the postoperative motor symptoms and QOL (decrease in the score of UPDRS and PDQ-39 SI) The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively in 11 patients despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. Unexpectedly, CSF HVA levels significantly increased from 0.00089±0.0003 ng/μl to 0.002±0.0008 ng/μl after STN-DBS. CONCLUSION: The preoperative catecholamine levels might affect the postoperative motor symptoms and quality of life. The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26394059/Subthalamic_Nucleus_Deep_Brain_Stimulation_Modulate_Catecholamine_Levels_with_Significant_Relations_to_Clinical_Outcome_after_Surgery_in_Patients_with_Parkinson's_Disease_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138462 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -