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Skin lesions in returning travellers.
Int Marit Health. 2015; 66(3):173-80.IM

Abstract

Skin lesions, apart from diarrhoeas, fever of unknown origin, and respiratory tract infections belong to the most frequent medical problems in travellers returned from tropical and subtropical destinations, accounting more than 10% of reported cases. Most dermatoses have their clinical onset during travel, although some of them can occur after return. Travel-related dermatological problems can have a wide spectrum of clinical picture, from macular, popular or nodular rash, linear and migratory lesions, to plaques, vesicles, bullae, erosions or ulcers. Skin conditions in returning travellers may be of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies. Infectious lesions may be originally tropical (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, myiasis, tungiasis, loiasis), although the majority are cosmopolitan (arthropod bites, sunburns, allergic rashes). The evaluation of skin lesions depends on many factors, including immune status of patients, use of medicines, exposure on health hazards (fauna, flora, risky behaviours), as well as the time, duration and location of travel. As the number of travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations has been continuously rising, the number of skin illnesses has also been increasing. This means that specialists in travel medicine need to extend their knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and diagnosis of travel-related health problems including skin lesions in returning travellers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Tropical Medicine, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. kktropmed@wp.pl.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26394319

Citation

Korzeniewski, Krzysztof, et al. "Skin Lesions in Returning Travellers." International Maritime Health, vol. 66, no. 3, 2015, pp. 173-80.
Korzeniewski K, Juszczak D, Jerzemowski J. Skin lesions in returning travellers. Int Marit Health. 2015;66(3):173-80.
Korzeniewski, K., Juszczak, D., & Jerzemowski, J. (2015). Skin lesions in returning travellers. International Maritime Health, 66(3), 173-80. https://doi.org/10.5603/IMH.2015.0034
Korzeniewski K, Juszczak D, Jerzemowski J. Skin Lesions in Returning Travellers. Int Marit Health. 2015;66(3):173-80. PubMed PMID: 26394319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Skin lesions in returning travellers. AU - Korzeniewski,Krzysztof, AU - Juszczak,Dariusz, AU - Jerzemowski,Janusz, PY - 2015/09/22/received PY - 2015/09/22/accepted PY - 2015/9/23/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/6/25/medline KW - returning travellers KW - skin lesions KW - tropics SP - 173 EP - 80 JF - International maritime health JO - Int Marit Health VL - 66 IS - 3 N2 - Skin lesions, apart from diarrhoeas, fever of unknown origin, and respiratory tract infections belong to the most frequent medical problems in travellers returned from tropical and subtropical destinations, accounting more than 10% of reported cases. Most dermatoses have their clinical onset during travel, although some of them can occur after return. Travel-related dermatological problems can have a wide spectrum of clinical picture, from macular, popular or nodular rash, linear and migratory lesions, to plaques, vesicles, bullae, erosions or ulcers. Skin conditions in returning travellers may be of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies. Infectious lesions may be originally tropical (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, myiasis, tungiasis, loiasis), although the majority are cosmopolitan (arthropod bites, sunburns, allergic rashes). The evaluation of skin lesions depends on many factors, including immune status of patients, use of medicines, exposure on health hazards (fauna, flora, risky behaviours), as well as the time, duration and location of travel. As the number of travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations has been continuously rising, the number of skin illnesses has also been increasing. This means that specialists in travel medicine need to extend their knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and diagnosis of travel-related health problems including skin lesions in returning travellers. SN - 2081-3252 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26394319/Skin_lesions_in_returning_travellers_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -