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Plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids in male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar; 70(3):306-12.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

We aimed to investigate the differences in plasma concentrations and in intakes of amino acids between male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

This cross-sectional analysis included 392 men, aged 30-49 years. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured with a targeted metabolomic approach using mass spectrometry, and dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Differences between diet groups in mean plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids were examined using analysis of variance, controlling for potential confounding factors and multiple testing.

RESULTS

In plasma, concentrations of 6 out of 21 amino acids varied significantly by diet group, with differences of -13% to +16% between meat-eaters and vegans. Concentrations of methionine, tryptophan and tyrosine were highest in fish-eaters and vegetarians, followed by meat-eaters, and lowest in vegans. A broadly similar pattern was seen for lysine, whereas alanine concentration was highest in fish-eaters and lowest in meat-eaters. For glycine, vegans had the highest concentration and meat-eaters the lowest. Intakes of all 18 dietary amino acids differed by diet group; for the majority of these, intake was highest in meat-eaters followed by fish-eaters, then vegetarians and lowest in vegans (up to 47% lower than in meat-eaters).

CONCLUSIONS

Men belonging to different habitual diet groups have significantly different plasma concentrations of lysine, methionine, tryptophan, alanine, glycine and tyrosine. However, the differences in plasma concentrations were less marked than and did not necessarily mirror those seen for amino acid intakes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26395436

Citation

Schmidt, J A., et al. "Plasma Concentrations and Intakes of Amino Acids in Male Meat-eaters, Fish-eaters, Vegetarians and Vegans: a Cross-sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Oxford Cohort." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 70, no. 3, 2016, pp. 306-12.
Schmidt JA, Rinaldi S, Scalbert A, et al. Plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids in male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016;70(3):306-12.
Schmidt, J. A., Rinaldi, S., Scalbert, A., Ferrari, P., Achaintre, D., Gunter, M. J., Appleby, P. N., Key, T. J., & Travis, R. C. (2016). Plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids in male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70(3), 306-12. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.144
Schmidt JA, et al. Plasma Concentrations and Intakes of Amino Acids in Male Meat-eaters, Fish-eaters, Vegetarians and Vegans: a Cross-sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Oxford Cohort. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016;70(3):306-12. PubMed PMID: 26395436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids in male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort. AU - Schmidt,J A, AU - Rinaldi,S, AU - Scalbert,A, AU - Ferrari,P, AU - Achaintre,D, AU - Gunter,M J, AU - Appleby,P N, AU - Key,T J, AU - Travis,R C, Y1 - 2015/09/23/ PY - 2014/11/10/received PY - 2015/07/01/revised PY - 2015/07/21/accepted PY - 2015/9/24/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/12/23/medline SP - 306 EP - 12 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 70 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the differences in plasma concentrations and in intakes of amino acids between male meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. SUBJECTS/METHODS: This cross-sectional analysis included 392 men, aged 30-49 years. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured with a targeted metabolomic approach using mass spectrometry, and dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Differences between diet groups in mean plasma concentrations and intakes of amino acids were examined using analysis of variance, controlling for potential confounding factors and multiple testing. RESULTS: In plasma, concentrations of 6 out of 21 amino acids varied significantly by diet group, with differences of -13% to +16% between meat-eaters and vegans. Concentrations of methionine, tryptophan and tyrosine were highest in fish-eaters and vegetarians, followed by meat-eaters, and lowest in vegans. A broadly similar pattern was seen for lysine, whereas alanine concentration was highest in fish-eaters and lowest in meat-eaters. For glycine, vegans had the highest concentration and meat-eaters the lowest. Intakes of all 18 dietary amino acids differed by diet group; for the majority of these, intake was highest in meat-eaters followed by fish-eaters, then vegetarians and lowest in vegans (up to 47% lower than in meat-eaters). CONCLUSIONS: Men belonging to different habitual diet groups have significantly different plasma concentrations of lysine, methionine, tryptophan, alanine, glycine and tyrosine. However, the differences in plasma concentrations were less marked than and did not necessarily mirror those seen for amino acid intakes. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26395436/Plasma_concentrations_and_intakes_of_amino_acids_in_male_meat_eaters_fish_eaters_vegetarians_and_vegans:_a_cross_sectional_analysis_in_the_EPIC_Oxford_cohort_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.144 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -