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Effects of maternal geohelminth infections on allergy in early childhood.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016; 137(3):899-906.e2JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Maternal geohelminth infections during pregnancy may protect against allergy development in childhood.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to investigate the effect of maternal geohelminths on the development of eczema, wheeze, and atopy during the first 3 years of life.

METHODS

A cohort of 2404 neonates was followed to 3 years of age in a rural district in coastal Ecuador. Data on wheeze and eczema were collected by means of questionnaire and physical examination at 13, 24, and 36 months of age. Atopy was measured based on skin prick test (SPT) reactivity to 9 allergens at 36 months. Maternal stool samples were examined for geohelminths by microscopy. Data on potential confounders was collected after birth by questionnaire.

RESULTS

Geohelminths were observed in 45.9% of mothers. Eczema and wheeze were reported for 17.7% and 25.9%, respectively, of 2069 (86.1%) children with complete follow-up to 3 years, and allergen SPT reactivity to any allergen was present in 17.2% and to house dust mite in 8.7%. Maternal geohelminth infections were not significantly associated with eczema (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26; 95% CI, 0.98-1.61), wheeze (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.82-1.27), and SPT reactivity to any allergen (adjusted OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.01). In subgroup analyses maternal geohelminths were associated with a significantly reduced risk of SPT reactivity to mite and other perennial allergens, and maternal ascariasis was associated with an increased risk of eczema and reduced risk of SPT reactivity to all allergens.

CONCLUSION

Our data do not support a protective effect of maternal infections with geohelminth parasites during pregnancy against the development of eczema and wheeze in early childhood, although there was evidence in subgroup analyses for a reduction in SPT reactivity to house dust mites and perennial allergens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS, Avenida Via Guayllabamba, Quininde, Ecuador; Centro de Investigacion en Enfermedades Infecciosas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, Quito, Ecuador; Institute of Infection and Immunity, St George's University of London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: pcooper@sgul.ac.uk.Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS, Avenida Via Guayllabamba, Quininde, Ecuador.Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Basilio de Gama, Salvador, Brazil.Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS, Avenida Via Guayllabamba, Quininde, Ecuador.Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS, Avenida Via Guayllabamba, Quininde, Ecuador.Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Basilio de Gama, Salvador, Brazil.Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Basilio de Gama, Salvador, Brazil.Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.Instituto de Saude Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Basilio de Gama, Salvador, Brazil.Institute of Public Health Sciences, St George's University of London, London, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26395817

Citation

Cooper, Philip J., et al. "Effects of Maternal Geohelminth Infections On Allergy in Early Childhood." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 137, no. 3, 2016, pp. 899-906.e2.
Cooper PJ, Chico ME, Amorim LD, et al. Effects of maternal geohelminth infections on allergy in early childhood. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;137(3):899-906.e2.
Cooper, P. J., Chico, M. E., Amorim, L. D., Sandoval, C., Vaca, M., Strina, A., ... Strachan, D. P. (2016). Effects of maternal geohelminth infections on allergy in early childhood. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 137(3), pp. 899-906.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2015.07.044.
Cooper PJ, et al. Effects of Maternal Geohelminth Infections On Allergy in Early Childhood. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;137(3):899-906.e2. PubMed PMID: 26395817.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of maternal geohelminth infections on allergy in early childhood. AU - Cooper,Philip J, AU - Chico,Martha E, AU - Amorim,Leila D, AU - Sandoval,Carlos, AU - Vaca,Maritza, AU - Strina,Agostino, AU - Campos,Ana Clara, AU - Rodrigues,Laura C, AU - Barreto,Mauricio L, AU - Strachan,David P, Y1 - 2015/09/26/ PY - 2015/01/23/received PY - 2015/07/09/revised PY - 2015/07/14/accepted PY - 2015/9/24/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/8/9/medline KW - Geohelminths KW - atopy KW - early childhood KW - eczema KW - maternal infections KW - wheeze SP - 899 EP - 906.e2 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 137 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Maternal geohelminth infections during pregnancy may protect against allergy development in childhood. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the effect of maternal geohelminths on the development of eczema, wheeze, and atopy during the first 3 years of life. METHODS: A cohort of 2404 neonates was followed to 3 years of age in a rural district in coastal Ecuador. Data on wheeze and eczema were collected by means of questionnaire and physical examination at 13, 24, and 36 months of age. Atopy was measured based on skin prick test (SPT) reactivity to 9 allergens at 36 months. Maternal stool samples were examined for geohelminths by microscopy. Data on potential confounders was collected after birth by questionnaire. RESULTS: Geohelminths were observed in 45.9% of mothers. Eczema and wheeze were reported for 17.7% and 25.9%, respectively, of 2069 (86.1%) children with complete follow-up to 3 years, and allergen SPT reactivity to any allergen was present in 17.2% and to house dust mite in 8.7%. Maternal geohelminth infections were not significantly associated with eczema (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26; 95% CI, 0.98-1.61), wheeze (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.82-1.27), and SPT reactivity to any allergen (adjusted OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.01). In subgroup analyses maternal geohelminths were associated with a significantly reduced risk of SPT reactivity to mite and other perennial allergens, and maternal ascariasis was associated with an increased risk of eczema and reduced risk of SPT reactivity to all allergens. CONCLUSION: Our data do not support a protective effect of maternal infections with geohelminth parasites during pregnancy against the development of eczema and wheeze in early childhood, although there was evidence in subgroup analyses for a reduction in SPT reactivity to house dust mites and perennial allergens. SN - 1097-6825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26395817/Effects_of_maternal_geohelminth_infections_on_allergy_in_early_childhood_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(15)01111-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -