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Movement velocity as a measure of exercise intensity in three lower limb exercises.
J Sports Sci. 2016; 34(12):1099-106.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between movement velocity and relative load in three lower limbs exercises commonly used to develop strength: leg press, full squat and half squat. The percentage of one repetition maximum (%1RM) has typically been used as the main parameter to control resistance training; however, more recent research has proposed movement velocity as an alternative. Fifteen participants performed a load progression with a range of loads until they reached their 1RM. Maximum instantaneous velocity (Vmax) and mean propulsive velocity (MPV) of the knee extension phase of each exercise were assessed. For all exercises, a strong relationship between Vmax and the %1RM was found: leg press (r(2)adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0244, -0.0258], P < 0.0001), full squat (r(2)adj = 0.94; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0144, -0.0139], P < 0.0001) and half squat (r(2)adj = 0.97; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0135, -0.00143], P < 0.0001); for MPV, leg press (r(2)adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0169, -0.0175], P < 0.0001, full squat (r(2)adj = 0.95; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0136, -0.0128], P < 0.0001) and half squat (r(2)adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0116, 0.0124], P < 0.0001). The 1RM was attained with a MPV and Vmax of 0.21 ± 0.06 m s(-1) and 0.63 ± 0.15 m s(-1), 0.29 ± 0.05 m s(-1) and 0.89 ± 0.17 m s(-1), 0.33 ± 0.05 m s(-1) and 0.95 ± 0.13 m s(-1) for leg press, full squat and half squat, respectively. Results indicate that it is possible to determine an exercise-specific %1RM by measuring movement velocity for that exercise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Faculdade de Desporto , Universidade do Porto , Porto , Portugal. b Laboratório de Biomecânica , Universidade do Porto , Porto , Portugal.a Faculdade de Desporto , Universidade do Porto , Porto , Portugal.c College of Arts and Science , School of Science & Technology, Nottingham Trent University , Nottingham , UK.d Facultad del Deporte , Universidad Pablo de Olavide , Sevilla , Spain.e Faculty of Physical Sciences and Sport , Catholic University of San Antonio , Murcia , Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26395837

Citation

Conceição, Filipe, et al. "Movement Velocity as a Measure of Exercise Intensity in Three Lower Limb Exercises." Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 34, no. 12, 2016, pp. 1099-106.
Conceição F, Fernandes J, Lewis M, et al. Movement velocity as a measure of exercise intensity in three lower limb exercises. J Sports Sci. 2016;34(12):1099-106.
Conceição, F., Fernandes, J., Lewis, M., Gonzaléz-Badillo, J. J., & Jimenéz-Reyes, P. (2016). Movement velocity as a measure of exercise intensity in three lower limb exercises. Journal of Sports Sciences, 34(12), 1099-106. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2015.1090010
Conceição F, et al. Movement Velocity as a Measure of Exercise Intensity in Three Lower Limb Exercises. J Sports Sci. 2016;34(12):1099-106. PubMed PMID: 26395837.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Movement velocity as a measure of exercise intensity in three lower limb exercises. AU - Conceição,Filipe, AU - Fernandes,Juvenal, AU - Lewis,Martin, AU - Gonzaléz-Badillo,Juan José, AU - Jimenéz-Reyes,Pedro, Y1 - 2015/09/22/ PY - 2015/9/24/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Resistance training KW - intensity KW - movement velocity KW - strength SP - 1099 EP - 106 JF - Journal of sports sciences JO - J Sports Sci VL - 34 IS - 12 N2 - The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between movement velocity and relative load in three lower limbs exercises commonly used to develop strength: leg press, full squat and half squat. The percentage of one repetition maximum (%1RM) has typically been used as the main parameter to control resistance training; however, more recent research has proposed movement velocity as an alternative. Fifteen participants performed a load progression with a range of loads until they reached their 1RM. Maximum instantaneous velocity (Vmax) and mean propulsive velocity (MPV) of the knee extension phase of each exercise were assessed. For all exercises, a strong relationship between Vmax and the %1RM was found: leg press (r(2)adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0244, -0.0258], P < 0.0001), full squat (r(2)adj = 0.94; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0144, -0.0139], P < 0.0001) and half squat (r(2)adj = 0.97; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0135, -0.00143], P < 0.0001); for MPV, leg press (r(2)adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0169, -0.0175], P < 0.0001, full squat (r(2)adj = 0.95; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0136, -0.0128], P < 0.0001) and half squat (r(2)adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [-0.0116, 0.0124], P < 0.0001). The 1RM was attained with a MPV and Vmax of 0.21 ± 0.06 m s(-1) and 0.63 ± 0.15 m s(-1), 0.29 ± 0.05 m s(-1) and 0.89 ± 0.17 m s(-1), 0.33 ± 0.05 m s(-1) and 0.95 ± 0.13 m s(-1) for leg press, full squat and half squat, respectively. Results indicate that it is possible to determine an exercise-specific %1RM by measuring movement velocity for that exercise. SN - 1466-447X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26395837/Movement_velocity_as_a_measure_of_exercise_intensity_in_three_lower_limb_exercises_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2015.1090010 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -