Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The mediating role of sleep disturbances in the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder and self-injurious behavior.
J Anxiety Disord. 2015 Oct; 35:68-74.JA

Abstract

Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with self-injurious behavior, it is currently unclear what mechanisms may account for this relationship. Sleep disturbances may be relevant as they are common among those with PTSD and are associated with emotion regulation difficulties, which may increase vulnerability to self-injurious behavior. As such, we investigated the relationship between PTSD and self-injurious behaviors, and the mediating roles of nightmares and insomnia. Hypotheses were tested cross-sectionally in a sample of psychology clinic outpatients (N=255). Participants completed a structured clinical interview assessing PTSD and self-report questionnaires measuring insomnia, nightmares, and self-injurious behaviors (i.e., Have you ever cut, burned, or scratched yourself on purpose?). PTSD was associated with self-injurious behavior after covarying for depression, and nightmare severity mediated the relationship between PTSD and self-injurious behavior. Findings are consistent with research indicating that sleep disturbances, specifically nightmares, are important predictors of poor outcomes among those with PTSD, and extend this research to suggest their role in self-injurious behaviors as well.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107W Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301, USA.Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107W Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301, USA.Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107W Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301, USA.Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107W Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301, USA.Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107W Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301, USA.Department of Psychology, Florida State University, 1107W Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306-4301, USA. Electronic address: schmidt@psy.fsu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26398304

Citation

Short, Nicole A., et al. "The Mediating Role of Sleep Disturbances in the Relationship Between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Self-injurious Behavior." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 35, 2015, pp. 68-74.
Short NA, Ennis CR, Oglesby ME, et al. The mediating role of sleep disturbances in the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder and self-injurious behavior. J Anxiety Disord. 2015;35:68-74.
Short, N. A., Ennis, C. R., Oglesby, M. E., Boffa, J. W., Joiner, T. E., & Schmidt, N. B. (2015). The mediating role of sleep disturbances in the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder and self-injurious behavior. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 35, 68-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2015.09.004
Short NA, et al. The Mediating Role of Sleep Disturbances in the Relationship Between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Self-injurious Behavior. J Anxiety Disord. 2015;35:68-74. PubMed PMID: 26398304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The mediating role of sleep disturbances in the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder and self-injurious behavior. AU - Short,Nicole A, AU - Ennis,Chelsea R, AU - Oglesby,Mary E, AU - Boffa,Joseph W, AU - Joiner,Thomas E, AU - Schmidt,Norman B, Y1 - 2015/09/14/ PY - 2015/07/08/received PY - 2015/09/07/revised PY - 2015/09/09/accepted PY - 2015/9/24/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/6/16/medline KW - Insomnia KW - Nightmares KW - Posttraumatic stress disorder KW - Self-injurious behavior SP - 68 EP - 74 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 35 N2 - Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with self-injurious behavior, it is currently unclear what mechanisms may account for this relationship. Sleep disturbances may be relevant as they are common among those with PTSD and are associated with emotion regulation difficulties, which may increase vulnerability to self-injurious behavior. As such, we investigated the relationship between PTSD and self-injurious behaviors, and the mediating roles of nightmares and insomnia. Hypotheses were tested cross-sectionally in a sample of psychology clinic outpatients (N=255). Participants completed a structured clinical interview assessing PTSD and self-report questionnaires measuring insomnia, nightmares, and self-injurious behaviors (i.e., Have you ever cut, burned, or scratched yourself on purpose?). PTSD was associated with self-injurious behavior after covarying for depression, and nightmare severity mediated the relationship between PTSD and self-injurious behavior. Findings are consistent with research indicating that sleep disturbances, specifically nightmares, are important predictors of poor outcomes among those with PTSD, and extend this research to suggest their role in self-injurious behaviors as well. SN - 1873-7897 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26398304/The_mediating_role_of_sleep_disturbances_in_the_relationship_between_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_and_self_injurious_behavior_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-6185(15)30017-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -