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Histoplasmosis: Up-to-Date Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med. 2015 Oct; 36(5):729-45.SR

Abstract

Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in the North America, Central America, and many countries of South America and also occurs in China, India, Southeast Asia, Africa, Australia, and Europe. Clinical syndromes are not specific and histoplasmosis often is overlooked in the evaluation of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, chronic cavitary pneumonia resembling tuberculosis or anaerobic infection, granulomatous inflammatory diseases such as sarcoidosis or Crohn disease, and malignancy. The diagnosis depends on understanding the geographic distribution, common clinical presentations, and tests used for diagnosis of histoplasmosis. While histoplasmosis resolves without treatment in most patients, treatment is indicated in all immunocompromised patients and those with progressive disseminated disease or chronic pulmonary disease. Treatment is appropriate in most patients with acute pulmonary disease but rarely in those with other pulmonary or mediastinal manifestations. The preferred agents include liposomal amphotericin B for more severe cases and itraconazole for milder cases and "step-down" therapy following response to amphotericin B.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana.Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.Department of Medicine, Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, Minnesota.Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.MiraVista Diagnostics, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26398539

Citation

Hage, Chadi A., et al. "Histoplasmosis: Up-to-Date Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management." Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 36, no. 5, 2015, pp. 729-45.
Hage CA, Azar MM, Bahr N, et al. Histoplasmosis: Up-to-Date Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management. Semin Respir Crit Care Med. 2015;36(5):729-45.
Hage, C. A., Azar, M. M., Bahr, N., Loyd, J., & Wheat, L. J. (2015). Histoplasmosis: Up-to-Date Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management. Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 36(5), 729-45. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0035-1562899
Hage CA, et al. Histoplasmosis: Up-to-Date Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management. Semin Respir Crit Care Med. 2015;36(5):729-45. PubMed PMID: 26398539.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Histoplasmosis: Up-to-Date Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management. AU - Hage,Chadi A, AU - Azar,Marwan M, AU - Bahr,Nathan, AU - Loyd,James, AU - Wheat,L Joseph, Y1 - 2015/09/23/ PY - 2015/9/24/entrez PY - 2015/9/24/pubmed PY - 2016/6/24/medline SP - 729 EP - 45 JF - Seminars in respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Semin Respir Crit Care Med VL - 36 IS - 5 N2 - Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in the North America, Central America, and many countries of South America and also occurs in China, India, Southeast Asia, Africa, Australia, and Europe. Clinical syndromes are not specific and histoplasmosis often is overlooked in the evaluation of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, chronic cavitary pneumonia resembling tuberculosis or anaerobic infection, granulomatous inflammatory diseases such as sarcoidosis or Crohn disease, and malignancy. The diagnosis depends on understanding the geographic distribution, common clinical presentations, and tests used for diagnosis of histoplasmosis. While histoplasmosis resolves without treatment in most patients, treatment is indicated in all immunocompromised patients and those with progressive disseminated disease or chronic pulmonary disease. Treatment is appropriate in most patients with acute pulmonary disease but rarely in those with other pulmonary or mediastinal manifestations. The preferred agents include liposomal amphotericin B for more severe cases and itraconazole for milder cases and "step-down" therapy following response to amphotericin B. SN - 1098-9048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26398539/full_citation L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0035-1562899 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -