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Optogenetic study of the projections from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to the central amygdala.
J Neurophysiol 2015; 114(5):2903-11JN

Abstract

It has been proposed that the central amygdala (CeA), particularly its medial sector (CeM), generates brief fear responses to discrete conditioned cues, whereas the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) promotes long-lasting, anxiety-like states in response to more diffuse contingencies. Although it is believed that BNST-CeA interactions determine the transition between short- and long-duration responses, the nature of these interactions remains unknown. To shed light on this question, we used a double viral strategy to drive the expression of channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in BNST cells that project to CeA. Next, using patch-clamp recordings in vitro, we investigated the connectivity of infected cells to noninfected cells in BNST and compared the influence of BNST axons on neurons in the medial and lateral (CeL) parts of CeA. CeA-projecting BNST cells were concentrated in the anterolateral (AL) and anteroventral (AV) sectors of BNST. Dense plexuses of BNST axons were observed throughout CeA. In CeA and BNST, light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials accounted for a minority of responses (0-9% of tested cells); inhibition prevailed. The incidence of inhibitory responses was higher in CeM than in CeL (66% and 43% of tested cells, respectively). Within BNST, the connections from CeA-projecting to non-CeA-targeting cells varied as a function of the BNST sector: 50% vs. 9% of tested cells exhibited light-evoked responses in BNST-AL vs. BNST-AV, respectively. Overall, these results suggest that via its projection to CeA, BNST exerts an inhibitory influence over cued fear and that BNST neurons projecting to CeA form contrasting connections in different BNST subnuclei.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers University-Newark, Newark, New Jersey.Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers University-Newark, Newark, New Jersey.Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers University-Newark, Newark, New Jersey pare@andromeda.rutgers.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26400259

Citation

Gungor, Nur Zeynep, et al. "Optogenetic Study of the Projections From the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis to the Central Amygdala." Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 114, no. 5, 2015, pp. 2903-11.
Gungor NZ, Yamamoto R, Paré D. Optogenetic study of the projections from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to the central amygdala. J Neurophysiol. 2015;114(5):2903-11.
Gungor, N. Z., Yamamoto, R., & Paré, D. (2015). Optogenetic study of the projections from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to the central amygdala. Journal of Neurophysiology, 114(5), pp. 2903-11. doi:10.1152/jn.00677.2015.
Gungor NZ, Yamamoto R, Paré D. Optogenetic Study of the Projections From the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis to the Central Amygdala. J Neurophysiol. 2015;114(5):2903-11. PubMed PMID: 26400259.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Optogenetic study of the projections from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to the central amygdala. AU - Gungor,Nur Zeynep, AU - Yamamoto,Ryo, AU - Paré,Denis, Y1 - 2015/09/23/ PY - 2015/07/08/received PY - 2015/09/21/accepted PY - 2015/9/25/entrez PY - 2015/9/25/pubmed PY - 2016/9/10/medline KW - BNST KW - anxiety KW - central amygdala KW - fear SP - 2903 EP - 11 JF - Journal of neurophysiology JO - J. Neurophysiol. VL - 114 IS - 5 N2 - It has been proposed that the central amygdala (CeA), particularly its medial sector (CeM), generates brief fear responses to discrete conditioned cues, whereas the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) promotes long-lasting, anxiety-like states in response to more diffuse contingencies. Although it is believed that BNST-CeA interactions determine the transition between short- and long-duration responses, the nature of these interactions remains unknown. To shed light on this question, we used a double viral strategy to drive the expression of channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in BNST cells that project to CeA. Next, using patch-clamp recordings in vitro, we investigated the connectivity of infected cells to noninfected cells in BNST and compared the influence of BNST axons on neurons in the medial and lateral (CeL) parts of CeA. CeA-projecting BNST cells were concentrated in the anterolateral (AL) and anteroventral (AV) sectors of BNST. Dense plexuses of BNST axons were observed throughout CeA. In CeA and BNST, light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials accounted for a minority of responses (0-9% of tested cells); inhibition prevailed. The incidence of inhibitory responses was higher in CeM than in CeL (66% and 43% of tested cells, respectively). Within BNST, the connections from CeA-projecting to non-CeA-targeting cells varied as a function of the BNST sector: 50% vs. 9% of tested cells exhibited light-evoked responses in BNST-AL vs. BNST-AV, respectively. Overall, these results suggest that via its projection to CeA, BNST exerts an inhibitory influence over cued fear and that BNST neurons projecting to CeA form contrasting connections in different BNST subnuclei. SN - 1522-1598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26400259/Optogenetic_study_of_the_projections_from_the_bed_nucleus_of_the_stria_terminalis_to_the_central_amygdala_ L2 - http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/jn.00677.2015?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -