Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Serum Iron, Zinc, and Copper Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Replication Study and Meta-Analyses.
J Alzheimers Dis 2015; 47(3):565-81JA

Abstract

To evaluate whether iron, zinc, and copper levels in serum are disarranged in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed meta-analyses of all studies on the topic published from 1984 to 2014 and contextually carried out a replication study in serum as well. Our meta-analysis results showed that serum zinc was significantly lower in AD patients. Our replication and meta-analysis results showed that serum copper was significantly higher in AD patients than in healthy controls, so our findings were consistent with the conclusions of four previously published copper meta-analyses. Even if a possible role of iron in the pathophysiology of the disease could not be ruled out, the results of our meta-analysis showed no change of serum iron levels in AD patients, but this conclusion was not robust and requires further investigation. The meta-regression analyses revealed that in some studies, differences in serum iron levels could be due to the different mean ages, while differences in zinc levels appeared to be due to the different sex ratios. However, the effect of sex ratio on serum zinc levels in our meta-analysis is subtle and needs further confirmation. Also, diverse demographic terms and methodological approaches appeared not to explain the high heterogeneity of our copper meta-analysis. Therefore, when investigating trace elements, covariants such as age and sex have to be taken into account in the analyses. In the light of these findings, we suggest that the possible alteration of serum zinc and copper levels are involved in the pathogenesis of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China.Columbia College, Columbia University, USA.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26401693

Citation

Wang, Zi-Xuan, et al. "Serum Iron, Zinc, and Copper Levels in Patients With Alzheimer's Disease: a Replication Study and Meta-Analyses." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 47, no. 3, 2015, pp. 565-81.
Wang ZX, Tan L, Wang HF, et al. Serum Iron, Zinc, and Copper Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Replication Study and Meta-Analyses. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;47(3):565-81.
Wang, Z. X., Tan, L., Wang, H. F., Ma, J., Liu, J., Tan, M. S., ... Yu, J. T. (2015). Serum Iron, Zinc, and Copper Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Replication Study and Meta-Analyses. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 47(3), pp. 565-81. doi:10.3233/JAD-143108.
Wang ZX, et al. Serum Iron, Zinc, and Copper Levels in Patients With Alzheimer's Disease: a Replication Study and Meta-Analyses. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;47(3):565-81. PubMed PMID: 26401693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum Iron, Zinc, and Copper Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Replication Study and Meta-Analyses. AU - Wang,Zi-Xuan, AU - Tan,Lan, AU - Wang,Hui-Fu, AU - Ma,Jing, AU - Liu,Jinyuan, AU - Tan,Meng-Shan, AU - Sun,Jia-Hao, AU - Zhu,Xi-Chen, AU - Jiang,Teng, AU - Yu,Jin-Tai, PY - 2015/9/25/entrez PY - 2015/9/25/pubmed PY - 2016/7/7/medline KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - meta-analysis KW - serum copper KW - serum iron KW - serum zinc SP - 565 EP - 81 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 47 IS - 3 N2 - To evaluate whether iron, zinc, and copper levels in serum are disarranged in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed meta-analyses of all studies on the topic published from 1984 to 2014 and contextually carried out a replication study in serum as well. Our meta-analysis results showed that serum zinc was significantly lower in AD patients. Our replication and meta-analysis results showed that serum copper was significantly higher in AD patients than in healthy controls, so our findings were consistent with the conclusions of four previously published copper meta-analyses. Even if a possible role of iron in the pathophysiology of the disease could not be ruled out, the results of our meta-analysis showed no change of serum iron levels in AD patients, but this conclusion was not robust and requires further investigation. The meta-regression analyses revealed that in some studies, differences in serum iron levels could be due to the different mean ages, while differences in zinc levels appeared to be due to the different sex ratios. However, the effect of sex ratio on serum zinc levels in our meta-analysis is subtle and needs further confirmation. Also, diverse demographic terms and methodological approaches appeared not to explain the high heterogeneity of our copper meta-analysis. Therefore, when investigating trace elements, covariants such as age and sex have to be taken into account in the analyses. In the light of these findings, we suggest that the possible alteration of serum zinc and copper levels are involved in the pathogenesis of AD. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26401693/Serum_Iron_Zinc_and_Copper_Levels_in_Patients_with_Alzheimer's_Disease:_A_Replication_Study_and_Meta_Analyses_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-143108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -