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Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.
PLoS One 2015; 10(9):e0138580Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Consumption of dietary fat has been reported to be associated with gastric cancer risk, but the results of epidemiologic studies remain inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between dietary fat intake and gastric cancer risk.

METHODS

A comprehensive search of PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify observational studies providing quantitative estimates between dietary fat and gastric cancer risk. Random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risk(SRR) in the highest versus lowest analysis. Categorical dose-response analysis was conducted to quantify the association between dietary fat intake and gastric cancer risk. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using I2 and tau2(between study variance)statistics. Subgroup analysis and publication bias analysis were also performed.

RESULTS

Twenty-two articles were included in the meta-analysis. The SRR for gastric cancer was 1.18 for individuals with highest intake versus lowest intake of total fat (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.999-1.39; n = 28; P< 0.001; tau2 = 0.12; I2 = 69.5%, 95% CI: 55%-79%) and 1.08 with a daily increase in total fat intake (20 g/d) (95%CI: 1.02-1.14; n = 6; P = 0.09; tau2 = 0.002; I2 = 46.8%, 95% CI: 0%-79%). Positive association between saturated fat intake (SRR = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.09-1.58;n = 18;P<0.001; tau2 = 0.08; I2 = 60.6%, 95% CI: 34%-76%), inverse association between polyunsaturated fat intake (SRR = 0.77; 95%CI: 0.65-0.92; n = 16; P = 0.003; tau2 = 0.06; I2 = 56.2%, 95% CI: 23%-75%) and vegetable fat intake (SRR = 0.55; 95%CI: 0.41-0.74; n = 4;P = 0.12; tau2 = 0.04; I2 = 48.6%, 95% CI: 0%-83%), and no association between monounsaturated fat intake (SRR = 1.00; 95%CI: 0.79-1.25; n = 14; P< 0.001; tau2 = 0.10; I2 = 63.0%, 95% CI: 34%-79%) and animal fat intake (SRR = 1.10; 95%CI: 0.90-1.33; n = 6; P = 0.13;tau2 = 0.02; I2 = 42.0%, 95% CI: 0%-70%) and gastric cancer risk were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that intake of total fat is potentially positively associated with gastric cancer risk, and specific subtypes of fats account for different effects. However, these findings should be confirmed by further well-designed cohort studies with detailed dietary assessments and strict control of confounders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Nursing Department, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.The Clinical Nutrition Center of Shanghai, Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26402223

Citation

Han, Jun, et al. "Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 9, 2015, pp. e0138580.
Han J, Jiang Y, Liu X, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(9):e0138580.
Han, J., Jiang, Y., Liu, X., Meng, Q., Xi, Q., Zhuang, Q., ... Wu, G. (2015). Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. PloS One, 10(9), pp. e0138580. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0138580.
Han J, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(9):e0138580. PubMed PMID: 26402223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. AU - Han,Jun, AU - Jiang,Yi, AU - Liu,Xiao, AU - Meng,Qingyang, AU - Xi,Qiulei, AU - Zhuang,Qiulin, AU - Han,Yusong, AU - Gao,Ying, AU - Ding,Qiurong, AU - Wu,Guohao, Y1 - 2015/09/24/ PY - 2015/05/04/received PY - 2015/09/01/accepted PY - 2015/9/25/entrez PY - 2015/9/25/pubmed PY - 2016/6/2/medline SP - e0138580 EP - e0138580 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 10 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Consumption of dietary fat has been reported to be associated with gastric cancer risk, but the results of epidemiologic studies remain inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between dietary fat intake and gastric cancer risk. METHODS: A comprehensive search of PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify observational studies providing quantitative estimates between dietary fat and gastric cancer risk. Random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risk(SRR) in the highest versus lowest analysis. Categorical dose-response analysis was conducted to quantify the association between dietary fat intake and gastric cancer risk. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using I2 and tau2(between study variance)statistics. Subgroup analysis and publication bias analysis were also performed. RESULTS: Twenty-two articles were included in the meta-analysis. The SRR for gastric cancer was 1.18 for individuals with highest intake versus lowest intake of total fat (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.999-1.39; n = 28; P< 0.001; tau2 = 0.12; I2 = 69.5%, 95% CI: 55%-79%) and 1.08 with a daily increase in total fat intake (20 g/d) (95%CI: 1.02-1.14; n = 6; P = 0.09; tau2 = 0.002; I2 = 46.8%, 95% CI: 0%-79%). Positive association between saturated fat intake (SRR = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.09-1.58;n = 18;P<0.001; tau2 = 0.08; I2 = 60.6%, 95% CI: 34%-76%), inverse association between polyunsaturated fat intake (SRR = 0.77; 95%CI: 0.65-0.92; n = 16; P = 0.003; tau2 = 0.06; I2 = 56.2%, 95% CI: 23%-75%) and vegetable fat intake (SRR = 0.55; 95%CI: 0.41-0.74; n = 4;P = 0.12; tau2 = 0.04; I2 = 48.6%, 95% CI: 0%-83%), and no association between monounsaturated fat intake (SRR = 1.00; 95%CI: 0.79-1.25; n = 14; P< 0.001; tau2 = 0.10; I2 = 63.0%, 95% CI: 34%-79%) and animal fat intake (SRR = 1.10; 95%CI: 0.90-1.33; n = 6; P = 0.13;tau2 = 0.02; I2 = 42.0%, 95% CI: 0%-70%) and gastric cancer risk were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intake of total fat is potentially positively associated with gastric cancer risk, and specific subtypes of fats account for different effects. However, these findings should be confirmed by further well-designed cohort studies with detailed dietary assessments and strict control of confounders. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26402223/full_citation L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138580 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -