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Allergens, air pollutants, and childhood allergic diseases.
Int J Hyg Environ Health 2016; 219(1):66-71IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The synergistic effect of allergens and air pollutants on the risk of allergic diseases is unclear.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the joint effect of outdoor pollutants and indoor allergens on the risk of allergic diseases.

METHODS

We enrolled 2661 kindergarten children from the CEAS cohort. Data on allergic diseases and environmental exposure were collected. Skin prick tests were performed. Individual exposure to air pollution was estimated using a geographic information system with the mean concentration of air pollutants. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association between air pollutants, allergen exposure and the risk of allergic diseases with adjustments for potential confounders.

RESULTS

Overall, 12.6% of the children had asthma, 30.0% had allergic rhinitis (AR), and 14.4% had atopic dermatitis (AD). Mite sensitization significantly increased the risk of AD, AR, and asthma (OR (95%CI) 2.15 (1.53-3.03), 1.94 (1.46-2.58), and 2.31 (1.63-3.29), respectively). Exposure to PM10, PM(2.5), CO, and O(3) was associated with asthma (OR (95% CI) 1.39 (1.03-1.87), 1.45 (1.07-1.97), 1.36 (1.01-1.83), and 0.68 (0.51-0.92), respectively). PM(2.5) may have increased the risk of AR (OR (95% CI) 1.54 (1.03-2.32). Mite sensitization showed a synergistic effect with PM(2.5) on the development of asthma (p < 0.001). Moreover, mite allergens may modify the effect of air pollutants on allergic diseases.

CONCLUSION

Dust mites and PM(2.5) play an important role on the risk of asthma and AR. Exposure to PM(2.5) and mite allergens had a synergistic effect on the development of asthma. Avoiding co-exposure to allergens and air pollutants is important.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. Electronic address: wij636@gmail.com.College of Public Health, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng-Hsin General Hospital, Taiwan.College of Public Health, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.College of Public Health, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26404109

Citation

Wang, I-Jen, et al. "Allergens, Air Pollutants, and Childhood Allergic Diseases." International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, vol. 219, no. 1, 2016, pp. 66-71.
Wang IJ, Tung TH, Tang CS, et al. Allergens, air pollutants, and childhood allergic diseases. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2016;219(1):66-71.
Wang, I. J., Tung, T. H., Tang, C. S., & Zhao, Z. H. (2016). Allergens, air pollutants, and childhood allergic diseases. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 219(1), pp. 66-71. doi:10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.09.001.
Wang IJ, et al. Allergens, Air Pollutants, and Childhood Allergic Diseases. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2016;219(1):66-71. PubMed PMID: 26404109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Allergens, air pollutants, and childhood allergic diseases. AU - Wang,I-Jen, AU - Tung,Tao-Hsin, AU - Tang,Chin-Sheng, AU - Zhao,Zi-Hao, Y1 - 2015/09/18/ PY - 2015/05/27/received PY - 2015/08/03/revised PY - 2015/09/09/accepted PY - 2015/9/26/entrez PY - 2015/9/26/pubmed PY - 2016/9/2/medline KW - Air pollutant KW - Allergen KW - Asthma SP - 66 EP - 71 JF - International journal of hygiene and environmental health JO - Int J Hyg Environ Health VL - 219 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The synergistic effect of allergens and air pollutants on the risk of allergic diseases is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the joint effect of outdoor pollutants and indoor allergens on the risk of allergic diseases. METHODS: We enrolled 2661 kindergarten children from the CEAS cohort. Data on allergic diseases and environmental exposure were collected. Skin prick tests were performed. Individual exposure to air pollution was estimated using a geographic information system with the mean concentration of air pollutants. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association between air pollutants, allergen exposure and the risk of allergic diseases with adjustments for potential confounders. RESULTS: Overall, 12.6% of the children had asthma, 30.0% had allergic rhinitis (AR), and 14.4% had atopic dermatitis (AD). Mite sensitization significantly increased the risk of AD, AR, and asthma (OR (95%CI) 2.15 (1.53-3.03), 1.94 (1.46-2.58), and 2.31 (1.63-3.29), respectively). Exposure to PM10, PM(2.5), CO, and O(3) was associated with asthma (OR (95% CI) 1.39 (1.03-1.87), 1.45 (1.07-1.97), 1.36 (1.01-1.83), and 0.68 (0.51-0.92), respectively). PM(2.5) may have increased the risk of AR (OR (95% CI) 1.54 (1.03-2.32). Mite sensitization showed a synergistic effect with PM(2.5) on the development of asthma (p < 0.001). Moreover, mite allergens may modify the effect of air pollutants on allergic diseases. CONCLUSION: Dust mites and PM(2.5) play an important role on the risk of asthma and AR. Exposure to PM(2.5) and mite allergens had a synergistic effect on the development of asthma. Avoiding co-exposure to allergens and air pollutants is important. SN - 1618-131X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26404109/Allergens_air_pollutants_and_childhood_allergic_diseases_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1438-4639(15)00118-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -