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Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Stroke 2015; 46(11):3124-30S

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Alcohol consumption is common in the United States and may confer beneficial cardiovascular effects at light-to-moderate doses. The alcohol-stroke relationship remains debated. We estimated the relationship between midlife, self-reported alcohol consumption and ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a biracial cohort.

METHODS

We examined 12,433 never and current drinkers in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, aged 45 to 64 years at baseline. Participants self-reported usual drinks per week of beer, wine, and liquor at baseline. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression to assess the association of current alcohol consumption relative to lifetime abstention with incident ischemic stroke and ICH and modification by sex-race group. We modeled alcohol intake with quadratic splines to further assess dose-response relationships.

RESULTS

One third of participants self-reported abstention, 39% and 24%, respectively, consumed ≤3 and 4 to 17 drinks/wk, and only 5% reported heavier drinking. There were 773 ischemic strokes and 81 ICH over follow-up (median≈22.6 years). For ischemic stroke, light and moderate alcohol consumption were not associated with incidence (hazard ratios, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.21; 1.06, 0.84-1.34), whereas heavier drinking was associated with a 31% increased rate relative to abstention (hazard ratios, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.92-1.86). For ICH, moderate-to-heavy (hazard ratios, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.07-3.70), but not light, consumption increased incidence.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-reported light-to-moderate alcohol consumption at midlife was not associated with reduced stroke risk compared with abstention over 20 years of follow-up in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Heavier consumption increased the risk for both outcomes as did moderate intake for ICH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.). sara.jones@unc.edu.From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.).From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.).From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.).From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.).From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.).From the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (S.B.J., L.L., C.L.A., W.D.R.); Cerebrovascular Division, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (R.F.G.); Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC (L.W.); and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson (E.S.).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26405203

Citation

Jones, Sara B., et al. "Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study." Stroke, vol. 46, no. 11, 2015, pp. 3124-30.
Jones SB, Loehr L, Avery CL, et al. Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Stroke. 2015;46(11):3124-30.
Jones, S. B., Loehr, L., Avery, C. L., Gottesman, R. F., Wruck, L., Shahar, E., & Rosamond, W. D. (2015). Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Stroke, 46(11), pp. 3124-30. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.010601.
Jones SB, et al. Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Stroke. 2015;46(11):3124-30. PubMed PMID: 26405203.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Midlife Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. AU - Jones,Sara B, AU - Loehr,Laura, AU - Avery,Christy L, AU - Gottesman,Rebecca F, AU - Wruck,Lisa, AU - Shahar,Eyal, AU - Rosamond,Wayne D, Y1 - 2015/09/24/ PY - 2015/06/26/received PY - 2015/08/31/accepted PY - 2015/9/26/entrez PY - 2015/9/26/pubmed PY - 2016/2/13/medline KW - alcohol consumption KW - cerebral hemorrhage KW - incidence KW - stroke SP - 3124 EP - 30 JF - Stroke JO - Stroke VL - 46 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Alcohol consumption is common in the United States and may confer beneficial cardiovascular effects at light-to-moderate doses. The alcohol-stroke relationship remains debated. We estimated the relationship between midlife, self-reported alcohol consumption and ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a biracial cohort. METHODS: We examined 12,433 never and current drinkers in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, aged 45 to 64 years at baseline. Participants self-reported usual drinks per week of beer, wine, and liquor at baseline. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression to assess the association of current alcohol consumption relative to lifetime abstention with incident ischemic stroke and ICH and modification by sex-race group. We modeled alcohol intake with quadratic splines to further assess dose-response relationships. RESULTS: One third of participants self-reported abstention, 39% and 24%, respectively, consumed ≤3 and 4 to 17 drinks/wk, and only 5% reported heavier drinking. There were 773 ischemic strokes and 81 ICH over follow-up (median≈22.6 years). For ischemic stroke, light and moderate alcohol consumption were not associated with incidence (hazard ratios, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.21; 1.06, 0.84-1.34), whereas heavier drinking was associated with a 31% increased rate relative to abstention (hazard ratios, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.92-1.86). For ICH, moderate-to-heavy (hazard ratios, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.07-3.70), but not light, consumption increased incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported light-to-moderate alcohol consumption at midlife was not associated with reduced stroke risk compared with abstention over 20 years of follow-up in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Heavier consumption increased the risk for both outcomes as did moderate intake for ICH. SN - 1524-4628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26405203/Midlife_Alcohol_Consumption_and_the_Risk_of_Stroke_in_the_Atherosclerosis_Risk_in_Communities_Study_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.010601?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -