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Health-care utilisation amongst pregnant women who experience sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue: secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 1835 pregnant women.
Sleep Breath. 2016 Mar; 20(1):355-62.SB

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Sleeping problems and fatigue in pregnancy are often accepted as a normal part of pregnancy; however, these conditions can be linked to serious consequences for both the mother and child. Despite established links between sleeping disturbance and a wide range of pregnancy complications, little is known about the health-care utilisation of women experiencing sleeping problems and fatigue. This study addresses the existing gap in the literature by examining cross-sectional data to identify health service utilisation patterns of pregnant women experiencing sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue.

METHODS

In 2010, a sub-study of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was conducted as a cross-sectional survey of 2445 women who had recently given birth. Associations between reported symptoms of sleeplessness and/or tiredness or fatigue and health service utilisation were determined using logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS

During their pregnancy, 15.2 % of women experienced sleeping problems while 35.4 % experienced tiredness or fatigue. Women most commonly consulted with an obstetrician (n = 96) or a general practitioner (GP) (n = 74) for their tiredness or fatigue rather than a midwife (n = 56). A substantial number of women sought help from a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioner for sleeping problems (33 %) or tiredness/fatigue (28 %).

DISCUSSION

Sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue is reported by a reasonable percentage of pregnant women, and women obtain assistance from conventional and CAM practitioners for their symptoms, but not all seek help. Given the serious implications of untreated sleep- and fatigue-related symptoms for mother and baby, this area of research deserves and requires more attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen Mitte, Faculty of Medicine, University of Duisburg-Essen, Knappschafts-Krakenhaus, Essen, Germany. Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia. Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia. amie.steel@uts.edu.au. Office of Research, Endeavour College of Natural Health, Fortitude Valley, QLD, Australia. amie.steel@uts.edu.au.Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26407961

Citation

Lauche, Romy, et al. "Health-care Utilisation Amongst Pregnant Women Who Experience Sleeping Problems And/or Tiredness or Fatigue: Secondary Analysis of a Cross-sectional Survey of 1835 Pregnant Women." Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, vol. 20, no. 1, 2016, pp. 355-62.
Lauche R, Hall H, Adams J, et al. Health-care utilisation amongst pregnant women who experience sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue: secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 1835 pregnant women. Sleep Breath. 2016;20(1):355-62.
Lauche, R., Hall, H., Adams, J., Steel, A., Broom, A., & Sibbritt, D. (2016). Health-care utilisation amongst pregnant women who experience sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue: secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 1835 pregnant women. Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 20(1), 355-62. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11325-015-1250-7
Lauche R, et al. Health-care Utilisation Amongst Pregnant Women Who Experience Sleeping Problems And/or Tiredness or Fatigue: Secondary Analysis of a Cross-sectional Survey of 1835 Pregnant Women. Sleep Breath. 2016;20(1):355-62. PubMed PMID: 26407961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health-care utilisation amongst pregnant women who experience sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue: secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 1835 pregnant women. AU - Lauche,Romy, AU - Hall,Helen, AU - Adams,Jon, AU - Steel,Amie, AU - Broom,Alex, AU - Sibbritt,David, Y1 - 2015/09/25/ PY - 2014/12/04/received PY - 2015/08/25/accepted PY - 2015/07/14/revised PY - 2015/9/27/entrez PY - 2015/9/27/pubmed PY - 2017/1/27/medline KW - Complementary therapies KW - Fatigue KW - Pregnancy KW - Sleep initiation and maintenance disorders SP - 355 EP - 62 JF - Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung JO - Sleep Breath VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Sleeping problems and fatigue in pregnancy are often accepted as a normal part of pregnancy; however, these conditions can be linked to serious consequences for both the mother and child. Despite established links between sleeping disturbance and a wide range of pregnancy complications, little is known about the health-care utilisation of women experiencing sleeping problems and fatigue. This study addresses the existing gap in the literature by examining cross-sectional data to identify health service utilisation patterns of pregnant women experiencing sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue. METHODS: In 2010, a sub-study of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was conducted as a cross-sectional survey of 2445 women who had recently given birth. Associations between reported symptoms of sleeplessness and/or tiredness or fatigue and health service utilisation were determined using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: During their pregnancy, 15.2 % of women experienced sleeping problems while 35.4 % experienced tiredness or fatigue. Women most commonly consulted with an obstetrician (n = 96) or a general practitioner (GP) (n = 74) for their tiredness or fatigue rather than a midwife (n = 56). A substantial number of women sought help from a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioner for sleeping problems (33 %) or tiredness/fatigue (28 %). DISCUSSION: Sleeping problems and/or tiredness or fatigue is reported by a reasonable percentage of pregnant women, and women obtain assistance from conventional and CAM practitioners for their symptoms, but not all seek help. Given the serious implications of untreated sleep- and fatigue-related symptoms for mother and baby, this area of research deserves and requires more attention. SN - 1522-1709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26407961/Health_care_utilisation_amongst_pregnant_women_who_experience_sleeping_problems_and/or_tiredness_or_fatigue:_secondary_analysis_of_a_cross_sectional_survey_of_1835_pregnant_women_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-015-1250-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -