Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Tele-ophthalmology: Opportunities for improving diabetes eye care in resource- and specialist-limited Sub-Saharan African countries.
J Telemed Telecare. 2016 Jul; 22(5):311-6.JT

Abstract

Tele-ophthalmology using portable retinal imaging technology, mobile phone and Internet connectivity offers a solution to improve access to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening services in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries where the burden of diabetes is increasing and there is limited access to eye care services and specialists. The Zimbabwe Retinopathy Telemedicine Project (ZRTP) established routine DR screening at a hospital-based diabetic clinic in the urban capital city, Harare. A handheld 'point and shoot' digital camera operated by a trained nurse was used to acquire retina images of 203 diabetic patients. A secured 'store-and forward' approach was set up and used for sharing and transfer of images to a retinal specialist at a remote site for reading. This method enabled detection of non-macular DR (11%), diabetic macular oedema (5%), cataract (5%) and glaucoma (6%) among the patients screened. ZRTP demonstrated the utility of tele-ophthalmology for routine retinal screening for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe who have limited access to eye care services. In addition, ZRTP showed how tele-ophthalmology services can provide an empirical framework for providing patient education, and a platform for research in the detection of DR. This approach could be used as a model to address the DR challenges in other countries in SSA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe amatimba@medsch.uz.ac.zw amatimba@gmail.com.Columbia University, USA.Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa Faculties des Sciences Biomédicales, Département de Biochimie, Université des Montagnes, République du Cameroun.Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa Division of Human Genetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe.Greenwood Park Eye Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26407990

Citation

Matimba, Alice, et al. "Tele-ophthalmology: Opportunities for Improving Diabetes Eye Care in Resource- and Specialist-limited Sub-Saharan African Countries." Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, vol. 22, no. 5, 2016, pp. 311-6.
Matimba A, Woodward R, Tambo E, et al. Tele-ophthalmology: Opportunities for improving diabetes eye care in resource- and specialist-limited Sub-Saharan African countries. J Telemed Telecare. 2016;22(5):311-6.
Matimba, A., Woodward, R., Tambo, E., Ramsay, M., Gwanzura, L., & Guramatunhu, S. (2016). Tele-ophthalmology: Opportunities for improving diabetes eye care in resource- and specialist-limited Sub-Saharan African countries. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 22(5), 311-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/1357633X15604083
Matimba A, et al. Tele-ophthalmology: Opportunities for Improving Diabetes Eye Care in Resource- and Specialist-limited Sub-Saharan African Countries. J Telemed Telecare. 2016;22(5):311-6. PubMed PMID: 26407990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tele-ophthalmology: Opportunities for improving diabetes eye care in resource- and specialist-limited Sub-Saharan African countries. AU - Matimba,Alice, AU - Woodward,Richmond, AU - Tambo,Ernest, AU - Ramsay,Michele, AU - Gwanzura,Lovemore, AU - Guramatunhu,Solomon, Y1 - 2015/09/24/ PY - 2015/03/18/received PY - 2015/08/18/accepted PY - 2015/9/27/entrez PY - 2015/9/27/pubmed PY - 2017/6/27/medline KW - Remote consultation KW - tele-ophthalmology KW - telemedicine SP - 311 EP - 6 JF - Journal of telemedicine and telecare JO - J Telemed Telecare VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - Tele-ophthalmology using portable retinal imaging technology, mobile phone and Internet connectivity offers a solution to improve access to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening services in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries where the burden of diabetes is increasing and there is limited access to eye care services and specialists. The Zimbabwe Retinopathy Telemedicine Project (ZRTP) established routine DR screening at a hospital-based diabetic clinic in the urban capital city, Harare. A handheld 'point and shoot' digital camera operated by a trained nurse was used to acquire retina images of 203 diabetic patients. A secured 'store-and forward' approach was set up and used for sharing and transfer of images to a retinal specialist at a remote site for reading. This method enabled detection of non-macular DR (11%), diabetic macular oedema (5%), cataract (5%) and glaucoma (6%) among the patients screened. ZRTP demonstrated the utility of tele-ophthalmology for routine retinal screening for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe who have limited access to eye care services. In addition, ZRTP showed how tele-ophthalmology services can provide an empirical framework for providing patient education, and a platform for research in the detection of DR. This approach could be used as a model to address the DR challenges in other countries in SSA. SN - 1758-1109 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26407990/Tele_ophthalmology:_Opportunities_for_improving_diabetes_eye_care_in_resource__and_specialist_limited_Sub_Saharan_African_countries_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1357633X15604083?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -