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Feeding Mode of Australian Infants in the First 12 Months of Life.
J Hum Lact. 2016 Nov; 32(4):NP95-NP104.JH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In 2011, Australia published a set of 6 population-level indicators assessing breastfeeding, formula use, and the introduction of soft/semisolid/solid foods.

OBJECTIVES

This study aimed to report the feeding practices of Australian infants against these indicators and determine the predictors of early breastfeeding cessation and introduction of solids.

METHODS

Mother-infant dyads (N = 1470) were recruited postnatally in 2 Australian capital cities and regional areas of 1 state between February 2008 and March 2009. Demographic and feeding intention data were collected by self-completed questionnaire at infant birth, with feeding practices (current feeding mode, age of breastfeeding cessation, age of formula and/or solids introduction) reported when the infant was between 4 and 7 months of age, and around 13 months of age. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of breastfeeding cessation and solids introduction.

RESULTS

Although initiation of breastfeeding was almost universal (93.3%), less than half of the infants were breastfed to 6 months (41.7%) and 33.3% were receiving solids by 4 months. Women who were socially disadvantaged, younger, less educated, unpartnered, primiparous, and/or overweight were most likely to have ceased breastfeeding before 6 months of age, and younger and/or less educated women were most likely to have introduced solid food by 4 months of age. Not producing adequate milk was the most common reason provided for cessation of breastfeeding.

CONCLUSION

The feeding behaviors of Australian infants in the first 12 months fall well short of recommendations. Women need anticipatory guidance as to the indicators of breastfeeding success and the tendency of women to doubt the adequacy of their breast milk supply warrants further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Nutrition & Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. 2 Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.1 Nutrition & Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.3 School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1 Nutrition & Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.1 Nutrition & Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. 2 Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26416440

Citation

Magarey, Anthea, et al. "Feeding Mode of Australian Infants in the First 12 Months of Life." Journal of Human Lactation : Official Journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, vol. 32, no. 4, 2016, pp. NP95-NP104.
Magarey A, Kavian F, Scott JA, et al. Feeding Mode of Australian Infants in the First 12 Months of Life. J Hum Lact. 2016;32(4):NP95-NP104.
Magarey, A., Kavian, F., Scott, J. A., Markow, K., & Daniels, L. (2016). Feeding Mode of Australian Infants in the First 12 Months of Life. Journal of Human Lactation : Official Journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, 32(4), NP95-NP104. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334415605835
Magarey A, et al. Feeding Mode of Australian Infants in the First 12 Months of Life. J Hum Lact. 2016;32(4):NP95-NP104. PubMed PMID: 26416440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feeding Mode of Australian Infants in the First 12 Months of Life. AU - Magarey,Anthea, AU - Kavian,Foorough, AU - Scott,Jane A, AU - Markow,Kylie, AU - Daniels,Lynne, Y1 - 2016/07/11/ PY - 2015/9/30/pubmed PY - 2017/9/13/medline PY - 2015/9/30/entrez KW - breastfeeding KW - indicators KW - longitudinal predictors SP - NP95 EP - NP104 JF - Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association JO - J Hum Lact VL - 32 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: In 2011, Australia published a set of 6 population-level indicators assessing breastfeeding, formula use, and the introduction of soft/semisolid/solid foods. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to report the feeding practices of Australian infants against these indicators and determine the predictors of early breastfeeding cessation and introduction of solids. METHODS: Mother-infant dyads (N = 1470) were recruited postnatally in 2 Australian capital cities and regional areas of 1 state between February 2008 and March 2009. Demographic and feeding intention data were collected by self-completed questionnaire at infant birth, with feeding practices (current feeding mode, age of breastfeeding cessation, age of formula and/or solids introduction) reported when the infant was between 4 and 7 months of age, and around 13 months of age. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of breastfeeding cessation and solids introduction. RESULTS: Although initiation of breastfeeding was almost universal (93.3%), less than half of the infants were breastfed to 6 months (41.7%) and 33.3% were receiving solids by 4 months. Women who were socially disadvantaged, younger, less educated, unpartnered, primiparous, and/or overweight were most likely to have ceased breastfeeding before 6 months of age, and younger and/or less educated women were most likely to have introduced solid food by 4 months of age. Not producing adequate milk was the most common reason provided for cessation of breastfeeding. CONCLUSION: The feeding behaviors of Australian infants in the first 12 months fall well short of recommendations. Women need anticipatory guidance as to the indicators of breastfeeding success and the tendency of women to doubt the adequacy of their breast milk supply warrants further investigation. SN - 1552-5732 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26416440/Feeding_Mode_of_Australian_Infants_in_the_First_12_Months_of_Life_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -