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Psychiatric comorbidity in women and men with eating disorders results from a large clinical database.
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Dec 15; 230(2):294-9.PR

Abstract

Psychiatric comorbidity is common in patients with eating disorders (ED), but prevalence estimates are heterogeneous, probably due to methodological differences between studies (population, diagnostic method, sampling procedure etc.) and a few studies include men. The aim of this study is to investigate psychiatric DSM-IV Axis I comorbidity in a large sample of adult patients, both males and females, with the whole spectrum of DSM-IV ED diagnoses. Initial presentation assessment data on 11,588 adult men and women presenting to specialist ED clinics in Sweden between 2008 and 2012 were extracted from a large clinical database. Diagnostics were based on semi-structured interviews (SCID-I) and the Structured Eating Disorder Interview (SEDI). Seventy-one percent of the patients with ED had at least one other Axis I disorder. The most common type of diagnosis was anxiety disorders (53%), where generalized anxiety disorder was the most common diagnosis. The highest levels of comorbidity were found for women with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and men with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Findings are consistent with previous research showing a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in both men and women with ED. The small gender differences observed seem negligible compared to the general similarity in comorbidity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stockholm Centre for Eating Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: sara.ulfvebrand@ki.se.Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Stockholm Centre for Eating Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Stockholm Centre for Eating Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26416590

Citation

Ulfvebrand, Sara, et al. "Psychiatric Comorbidity in Women and Men With Eating Disorders Results From a Large Clinical Database." Psychiatry Research, vol. 230, no. 2, 2015, pp. 294-9.
Ulfvebrand S, Birgegård A, Norring C, et al. Psychiatric comorbidity in women and men with eating disorders results from a large clinical database. Psychiatry Res. 2015;230(2):294-9.
Ulfvebrand, S., Birgegård, A., Norring, C., Högdahl, L., & von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Y. (2015). Psychiatric comorbidity in women and men with eating disorders results from a large clinical database. Psychiatry Research, 230(2), 294-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2015.09.008
Ulfvebrand S, et al. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Women and Men With Eating Disorders Results From a Large Clinical Database. Psychiatry Res. 2015 Dec 15;230(2):294-9. PubMed PMID: 26416590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychiatric comorbidity in women and men with eating disorders results from a large clinical database. AU - Ulfvebrand,Sara, AU - Birgegård,Andreas, AU - Norring,Claes, AU - Högdahl,Louise, AU - von Hausswolff-Juhlin,Yvonne, Y1 - 2015/09/15/ PY - 2014/09/21/received PY - 2015/09/04/revised PY - 2015/09/06/accepted PY - 2015/9/30/entrez PY - 2015/9/30/pubmed PY - 2016/7/1/medline KW - Eating disorder KW - Female KW - Male KW - Psychiatric co-morbidity KW - SCID-1 SP - 294 EP - 9 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 230 IS - 2 N2 - Psychiatric comorbidity is common in patients with eating disorders (ED), but prevalence estimates are heterogeneous, probably due to methodological differences between studies (population, diagnostic method, sampling procedure etc.) and a few studies include men. The aim of this study is to investigate psychiatric DSM-IV Axis I comorbidity in a large sample of adult patients, both males and females, with the whole spectrum of DSM-IV ED diagnoses. Initial presentation assessment data on 11,588 adult men and women presenting to specialist ED clinics in Sweden between 2008 and 2012 were extracted from a large clinical database. Diagnostics were based on semi-structured interviews (SCID-I) and the Structured Eating Disorder Interview (SEDI). Seventy-one percent of the patients with ED had at least one other Axis I disorder. The most common type of diagnosis was anxiety disorders (53%), where generalized anxiety disorder was the most common diagnosis. The highest levels of comorbidity were found for women with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and men with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Findings are consistent with previous research showing a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in both men and women with ED. The small gender differences observed seem negligible compared to the general similarity in comorbidity. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26416590/Psychiatric_comorbidity_in_women_and_men_with_eating_disorders_results_from_a_large_clinical_database_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-1781(15)30292-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -