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Alcohol consumption and risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma in women and men: 3 prospective cohort studies.
Am J Clin Nutr 2015; 102(5):1158-66AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased prevalence of sunburn, which is an established skin cancer risk factor.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated whether alcohol consumption is associated with risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC).

DESIGN

We conducted a prospective analysis on alcohol consumption and risk of BCC on the basis of data from 167,765 women in the NHS (Nurses' Health Study) (1984-2010) and NHS II (1991-2011) and 43,697 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2010). Alcohol intake was repeatedly assessed every 2-4 y over the follow-up period. HRs and 95% CIs for BCC in association with alcohol intake were computed with the use of Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for sun exposure and other skin cancer risk factors.

RESULTS

A total of 28,951 incident BCC cases were documented over 3.74 million person-years of follow-up. Increased alcohol intake was associated with increased BCC risk in both women and men (both P-trend < 0.0001). Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs over increasing cumulative averaged alcohol intake categories were 1.00 (reference) for nondrinkers, 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.20) for 0.1-9.9 g/d, 1.24 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.35) for 10.0-19.9 g/d, 1.27 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.35) for 20.0-29.9 g/d, and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.30) for ≥30.0 g/d (P-trend < 0.0001, P-heterogeneity by study = 0.10). The association remained consistent when we used alcohol intakes over different latency periods (0-4, 4-8, 8-12, and 12-16 y) as exposures and over categories of sun exposure-related factors. In the individual alcoholic beverages, white wine and liquor were positively associated with BCC risk.

CONCLUSION

Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of cutaneous BCC in both women and men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, and Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; eunyoung_cho@brown.edu nhshw@channing.harvard.edu.Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, and Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI;Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, and Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and Department of Dermatology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI.Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, and Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and eunyoung_cho@brown.edu nhshw@channing.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26423390

Citation

Wu, Shaowei, et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Cutaneous Basal Cell Carcinoma in Women and Men: 3 Prospective Cohort Studies." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 102, no. 5, 2015, pp. 1158-66.
Wu S, Li WQ, Qureshi AA, et al. Alcohol consumption and risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma in women and men: 3 prospective cohort studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(5):1158-66.
Wu, S., Li, W. Q., Qureshi, A. A., & Cho, E. (2015). Alcohol consumption and risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma in women and men: 3 prospective cohort studies. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 102(5), pp. 1158-66. doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.115196.
Wu S, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Cutaneous Basal Cell Carcinoma in Women and Men: 3 Prospective Cohort Studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(5):1158-66. PubMed PMID: 26423390.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma in women and men: 3 prospective cohort studies. AU - Wu,Shaowei, AU - Li,Wen-Qing, AU - Qureshi,Abrar A, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, Y1 - 2015/09/30/ PY - 2015/05/12/received PY - 2015/08/26/accepted PY - 2015/10/2/entrez PY - 2015/10/2/pubmed PY - 2016/2/9/medline KW - alcohol KW - basal cell carcinoma KW - cohort study KW - epidemiology KW - skin cancer KW - sun exposure SP - 1158 EP - 66 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 102 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased prevalence of sunburn, which is an established skin cancer risk factor. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether alcohol consumption is associated with risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC). DESIGN: We conducted a prospective analysis on alcohol consumption and risk of BCC on the basis of data from 167,765 women in the NHS (Nurses' Health Study) (1984-2010) and NHS II (1991-2011) and 43,697 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2010). Alcohol intake was repeatedly assessed every 2-4 y over the follow-up period. HRs and 95% CIs for BCC in association with alcohol intake were computed with the use of Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for sun exposure and other skin cancer risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 28,951 incident BCC cases were documented over 3.74 million person-years of follow-up. Increased alcohol intake was associated with increased BCC risk in both women and men (both P-trend < 0.0001). Pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs over increasing cumulative averaged alcohol intake categories were 1.00 (reference) for nondrinkers, 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.20) for 0.1-9.9 g/d, 1.24 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.35) for 10.0-19.9 g/d, 1.27 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.35) for 20.0-29.9 g/d, and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.30) for ≥30.0 g/d (P-trend < 0.0001, P-heterogeneity by study = 0.10). The association remained consistent when we used alcohol intakes over different latency periods (0-4, 4-8, 8-12, and 12-16 y) as exposures and over categories of sun exposure-related factors. In the individual alcoholic beverages, white wine and liquor were positively associated with BCC risk. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of cutaneous BCC in both women and men. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26423390/Alcohol_consumption_and_risk_of_cutaneous_basal_cell_carcinoma_in_women_and_men:_3_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.115.115196 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -