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Interacting effects of maternal responsiveness, infant regulatory problems and dopamine D4 receptor gene in the development of dysregulation during childhood: A longitudinal analysis.
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Nov; 70:83-90.JP

Abstract

Recent longitudinal studies have indicated that affective and behavioral dysregulation in childhood is associated with an increased risk for various negative outcomes in later life. However, few studies to date have examined early mechanisms preceding dysregulation during early childhood. Aim of this study was to elucidate early mechanisms relating to dysregulation in later life using data from an epidemiological cohort study on the long-term outcome of early risk factors from birth to adulthood. At age 3 months, mothers and infants were videotaped during a nursing and playing situation. Maternal responsiveness was evaluated by trained raters. Infant regulatory problems were assessed on the basis of a parent interview and direct observation by trained raters. At age 8 and 11 years, 290 children (139 males) were rated on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Additionally, participants were genotyped for the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) exon 3 VNTR polymorphism. A significant three-way interaction between maternal responsiveness, DRD4 genotype and infant regulatory problems was detected predicting the CBCL-dysregulation profile (CBCL-DP). Carriers of the DRD4 7r allele with regulatory problems at age 3 months showed significantly more behavior problems associated with the CBCL-DP during childhood when exposed to less maternal responsiveness. In contrast, no effect of maternal responsiveness was observed in DRD4 7r carriers without infant regulatory problems and in non-carriers of the DRD4 7r allele. This prospective longitudinal study extends earlier findings regarding the association of the CBCL-DP with early parenting and later psychopathology, introducing both DRD4 genotype and infant regulatory problems as important moderators.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: luise.poustka@zi-mannheim.de.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Biostatistics, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, Philipps-University, Marburg, Germany.Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Neuroscience Center Zurich, University and ETH, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26424426

Citation

Poustka, Luise, et al. "Interacting Effects of Maternal Responsiveness, Infant Regulatory Problems and Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene in the Development of Dysregulation During Childhood: a Longitudinal Analysis." Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 70, 2015, pp. 83-90.
Poustka L, Zohsel K, Blomeyer D, et al. Interacting effects of maternal responsiveness, infant regulatory problems and dopamine D4 receptor gene in the development of dysregulation during childhood: A longitudinal analysis. J Psychiatr Res. 2015;70:83-90.
Poustka, L., Zohsel, K., Blomeyer, D., Jennen-Steinmetz, C., Schmid, B., Trautmann-Villalba, P., Hohmann, S., Becker, K., Esser, G., Schmidt, M. H., Brandeis, D., Banaschewski, T., & Laucht, M. (2015). Interacting effects of maternal responsiveness, infant regulatory problems and dopamine D4 receptor gene in the development of dysregulation during childhood: A longitudinal analysis. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 70, 83-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.08.018
Poustka L, et al. Interacting Effects of Maternal Responsiveness, Infant Regulatory Problems and Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene in the Development of Dysregulation During Childhood: a Longitudinal Analysis. J Psychiatr Res. 2015;70:83-90. PubMed PMID: 26424426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interacting effects of maternal responsiveness, infant regulatory problems and dopamine D4 receptor gene in the development of dysregulation during childhood: A longitudinal analysis. AU - Poustka,Luise, AU - Zohsel,Katrin, AU - Blomeyer,Dorothea, AU - Jennen-Steinmetz,Christine, AU - Schmid,Brigitte, AU - Trautmann-Villalba,Patricia, AU - Hohmann,Sarah, AU - Becker,Katja, AU - Esser,Günter, AU - Schmidt,Martin H, AU - Brandeis,Daniel, AU - Banaschewski,Tobias, AU - Laucht,Manfred, Y1 - 2015/08/29/ PY - 2014/12/12/received PY - 2015/08/13/revised PY - 2015/08/28/accepted PY - 2015/10/2/entrez PY - 2015/10/2/pubmed PY - 2016/7/13/medline KW - Childhood KW - DRD4 KW - Dysregulation KW - Gene–environment interaction KW - Infant regulatory problems KW - Parenting quality SP - 83 EP - 90 JF - Journal of psychiatric research JO - J Psychiatr Res VL - 70 N2 - Recent longitudinal studies have indicated that affective and behavioral dysregulation in childhood is associated with an increased risk for various negative outcomes in later life. However, few studies to date have examined early mechanisms preceding dysregulation during early childhood. Aim of this study was to elucidate early mechanisms relating to dysregulation in later life using data from an epidemiological cohort study on the long-term outcome of early risk factors from birth to adulthood. At age 3 months, mothers and infants were videotaped during a nursing and playing situation. Maternal responsiveness was evaluated by trained raters. Infant regulatory problems were assessed on the basis of a parent interview and direct observation by trained raters. At age 8 and 11 years, 290 children (139 males) were rated on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Additionally, participants were genotyped for the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) exon 3 VNTR polymorphism. A significant three-way interaction between maternal responsiveness, DRD4 genotype and infant regulatory problems was detected predicting the CBCL-dysregulation profile (CBCL-DP). Carriers of the DRD4 7r allele with regulatory problems at age 3 months showed significantly more behavior problems associated with the CBCL-DP during childhood when exposed to less maternal responsiveness. In contrast, no effect of maternal responsiveness was observed in DRD4 7r carriers without infant regulatory problems and in non-carriers of the DRD4 7r allele. This prospective longitudinal study extends earlier findings regarding the association of the CBCL-DP with early parenting and later psychopathology, introducing both DRD4 genotype and infant regulatory problems as important moderators. SN - 1879-1379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26424426/Interacting_effects_of_maternal_responsiveness_infant_regulatory_problems_and_dopamine_D4_receptor_gene_in_the_development_of_dysregulation_during_childhood:_A_longitudinal_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3956(15)00260-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -