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Intensity and Types of Physical Exercise in Relation to Dementia Risk Reduction in Community-Living Older Adults.
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Oct 01; 16(10):899.e1-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To systematically examine the amount and type of physical exercise that might reduce the future risk of dementia in community-living older people.

DESIGN

Six-year observational study.

SETTING

All the Elderly Health Centers (EHCs) of the Department of Health in Hong Kong.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 15,589 community-living Chinese aged 65 years and older with no history of stroke, clinical dementia, or Parkinson disease when they completed health assessment at the EHCs in the first 6 months of 2005.

MEASUREMENTS

Self-reported habitual physical exercise patterns, including the frequency, duration, and type of exercise, at baseline and Year 3 were analyzed. The study outcome was incident dementia in 6 years. Dementia was defined by presence of clinical dementia in accordance with the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems or Clinical Dementia Rating of 1 to 3.

RESULTS

Both the cognitively stable and incident groups reported exercising a median of 7 days per week and 45 minutes per day at baseline and Year 3. The former practiced aerobic and mind-body exercises more at baseline and Year 3, whereas the latter practiced stretching and toning exercises more. The odds ratio for dementia remained significant for aerobic (0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.68-0.95; P = .01) and mind-body exercises (0.76; 0.63-0.92; P = .004) after excluding participants who developed dementia within 3 years after baseline and adjusting for important potential confounders, such as age, gender, educational level, and physical and psychiatric comorbidities.

CONCLUSION

Although physical exercise is widely promoted as a nonpharmacological intervention for dementia prevention, not all types of exercise appear to be useful in reducing risk of dementia in older people. Our findings suggest that daily participation in aerobic and mind-body but not stretching and toning exercises might protect community-living older adults from developing dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at University College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.Elderly Health Service, Department of Health, The Government of Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong SAR, China.Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. Electronic address: cwlam@cuhk.edu.hk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26433864

Citation

Lee, Allen T C., et al. "Intensity and Types of Physical Exercise in Relation to Dementia Risk Reduction in Community-Living Older Adults." Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, vol. 16, no. 10, 2015, pp. 899.e1-7.
Lee AT, Richards M, Chan WC, et al. Intensity and Types of Physical Exercise in Relation to Dementia Risk Reduction in Community-Living Older Adults. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015;16(10):899.e1-7.
Lee, A. T., Richards, M., Chan, W. C., Chiu, H. F., Lee, R. S., & Lam, L. C. (2015). Intensity and Types of Physical Exercise in Relation to Dementia Risk Reduction in Community-Living Older Adults. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 16(10), e1-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2015.07.012
Lee AT, et al. Intensity and Types of Physical Exercise in Relation to Dementia Risk Reduction in Community-Living Older Adults. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Oct 1;16(10):899.e1-7. PubMed PMID: 26433864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intensity and Types of Physical Exercise in Relation to Dementia Risk Reduction in Community-Living Older Adults. AU - Lee,Allen T C, AU - Richards,Marcus, AU - Chan,Wai C, AU - Chiu,Helen F K, AU - Lee,Ruby S Y, AU - Lam,Linda C W, PY - 2015/03/20/received PY - 2015/07/13/revised PY - 2015/07/24/accepted PY - 2015/10/5/entrez PY - 2015/10/5/pubmed PY - 2016/7/20/medline KW - Physical exercise KW - aerobic exercise KW - dementia KW - mind-body exercise KW - older people SP - 899.e1 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association JO - J Am Med Dir Assoc VL - 16 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the amount and type of physical exercise that might reduce the future risk of dementia in community-living older people. DESIGN: Six-year observational study. SETTING: All the Elderly Health Centers (EHCs) of the Department of Health in Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 15,589 community-living Chinese aged 65 years and older with no history of stroke, clinical dementia, or Parkinson disease when they completed health assessment at the EHCs in the first 6 months of 2005. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported habitual physical exercise patterns, including the frequency, duration, and type of exercise, at baseline and Year 3 were analyzed. The study outcome was incident dementia in 6 years. Dementia was defined by presence of clinical dementia in accordance with the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems or Clinical Dementia Rating of 1 to 3. RESULTS: Both the cognitively stable and incident groups reported exercising a median of 7 days per week and 45 minutes per day at baseline and Year 3. The former practiced aerobic and mind-body exercises more at baseline and Year 3, whereas the latter practiced stretching and toning exercises more. The odds ratio for dementia remained significant for aerobic (0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.68-0.95; P = .01) and mind-body exercises (0.76; 0.63-0.92; P = .004) after excluding participants who developed dementia within 3 years after baseline and adjusting for important potential confounders, such as age, gender, educational level, and physical and psychiatric comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Although physical exercise is widely promoted as a nonpharmacological intervention for dementia prevention, not all types of exercise appear to be useful in reducing risk of dementia in older people. Our findings suggest that daily participation in aerobic and mind-body but not stretching and toning exercises might protect community-living older adults from developing dementia. SN - 1538-9375 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26433864/Intensity_and_Types_of_Physical_Exercise_in_Relation_to_Dementia_Risk_Reduction_in_Community_Living_Older_Adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1525-8610(15)00491-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -