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The Nutrient Content of U.S. Household Food Purchases by Store Type.
Am J Prev Med. 2016 Feb; 50(2):180-90.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Little is known about where households shop for packaged foods, what foods and beverages they purchase, and the nutrient content of these purchases. This study describes volume trends and nutrient content (nutrient profiles, food and beverage groups) of household packaged foods purchases (PFPs) by store type.

METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis of U.S. households' PFPs (Nielsen Homescan) from 2000 to 2012 (N=652,023 household-year observations) with survey weights used for national representativeness. Household PFP trends (% volume), household purchases of key food and beverage groups based on caloric contribution, and mean caloric and nutrient densities (sugars, saturated fat, and sodium) of household PFPs were analyzed by store type. Data were collected from 2000 to 2012. Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015.

RESULTS

The proportion of total volume of household PFPs significantly increased from 2000 to 2012 for mass merchandisers (13.1% to 23.9%), convenience stores (3.6% to 5.9%), and warehouse clubs (6.2% to 9.8%), and significantly decreased for grocery chains (58.5% to 46.3%) and non-chain grocers (10.3% to 5.2%). Top common sources of calories (%) from household PFPs by food/beverage group included: savory snacks, grain-based desserts, and regular soft drinks. The energy, total sugar, sodium, and saturated fat densities of household PFPs from mass merchandisers, warehouse clubs, and convenience stores were higher compared with grocery stores.

CONCLUSIONS

PFPs from stores with poorer nutrient density (more energy, total sugar, sodium, and saturated fat-dense), such as warehouse clubs, mass merchandisers, and convenience stores are growing, representing a potential U.S. public health concern.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Duke-UNC Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: popkin@unc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26437868

Citation

Stern, Dalia, et al. "The Nutrient Content of U.S. Household Food Purchases By Store Type." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 50, no. 2, 2016, pp. 180-90.
Stern D, Ng SW, Popkin BM. The Nutrient Content of U.S. Household Food Purchases by Store Type. Am J Prev Med. 2016;50(2):180-90.
Stern, D., Ng, S. W., & Popkin, B. M. (2016). The Nutrient Content of U.S. Household Food Purchases by Store Type. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 50(2), 180-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.07.025
Stern D, Ng SW, Popkin BM. The Nutrient Content of U.S. Household Food Purchases By Store Type. Am J Prev Med. 2016;50(2):180-90. PubMed PMID: 26437868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Nutrient Content of U.S. Household Food Purchases by Store Type. AU - Stern,Dalia, AU - Ng,Shu Wen, AU - Popkin,Barry M, Y1 - 2015/10/01/ PY - 2015/01/22/received PY - 2015/07/01/revised PY - 2015/07/13/accepted PY - 2015/10/7/entrez PY - 2015/10/7/pubmed PY - 2016/10/25/medline SP - 180 EP - 90 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Little is known about where households shop for packaged foods, what foods and beverages they purchase, and the nutrient content of these purchases. This study describes volume trends and nutrient content (nutrient profiles, food and beverage groups) of household packaged foods purchases (PFPs) by store type. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of U.S. households' PFPs (Nielsen Homescan) from 2000 to 2012 (N=652,023 household-year observations) with survey weights used for national representativeness. Household PFP trends (% volume), household purchases of key food and beverage groups based on caloric contribution, and mean caloric and nutrient densities (sugars, saturated fat, and sodium) of household PFPs were analyzed by store type. Data were collected from 2000 to 2012. Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015. RESULTS: The proportion of total volume of household PFPs significantly increased from 2000 to 2012 for mass merchandisers (13.1% to 23.9%), convenience stores (3.6% to 5.9%), and warehouse clubs (6.2% to 9.8%), and significantly decreased for grocery chains (58.5% to 46.3%) and non-chain grocers (10.3% to 5.2%). Top common sources of calories (%) from household PFPs by food/beverage group included: savory snacks, grain-based desserts, and regular soft drinks. The energy, total sugar, sodium, and saturated fat densities of household PFPs from mass merchandisers, warehouse clubs, and convenience stores were higher compared with grocery stores. CONCLUSIONS: PFPs from stores with poorer nutrient density (more energy, total sugar, sodium, and saturated fat-dense), such as warehouse clubs, mass merchandisers, and convenience stores are growing, representing a potential U.S. public health concern. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26437868/The_Nutrient_Content_of_U_S__Household_Food_Purchases_by_Store_Type_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(15)00415-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -