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Long-term Consistency in Rotavirus Vaccine Protection: RV5 and RV1 Vaccine Effectiveness in US Children, 2012-2013.
Clin Infect Dis 2015; 61(12):1792-9CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Using a multicenter, active surveillance network from 2 rotavirus seasons (2012 and 2013), we assessed the vaccine effectiveness of RV5 (RotaTeq) and RV1 (Rotarix) rotavirus vaccines in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits for numerous demographic and secular strata.

METHODS

We enrolled children hospitalized or visiting the ED with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) for the 2012 and 2013 seasons at 7 medical institutions. Stool specimens were tested for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped, and rotavirus vaccination histories were compared for rotavirus-positive cases and rotavirus-negative AGE controls. We calculated the vaccine effectiveness (VE) for preventing rotavirus associated hospitalizations and ED visits for each vaccine, stratified by vaccine dose, season, clinical setting, age, predominant genotype, and ethnicity.

RESULTS

RV5-specific VE analyses included 2961 subjects, 402 rotavirus cases (14%) and 2559 rotavirus-negative AGE controls. RV1-specific VE analyses included 904 subjects, 100 rotavirus cases (11%), and 804 rotavirus-negative AGE controls. Over the 2 rotavirus seasons, the VE for a complete 3-dose vaccination with RV5 was 80% (confidence interval [CI], 74%-84%), and VE for a complete 2-dose vaccination with RV1 was 80% (CI, 68%-88%).Statistically significant VE was observed for each year of life for which sufficient data allowed analysis (7 years for RV5 and 3 years for RV1). Both vaccines provided statistically significant genotype-specific protection against predominant circulating rotavirus strains.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, geographically and demographically diverse sample of US children, we observed that RV5 and RV1 rotavirus vaccines each provided a lasting and broadly heterologous protection against rotavirus gastroenteritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.The Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri.UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, California.Texas Children's Hospital Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.Seattle Children's Hospital, Washington.Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio.Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York University of California, Los Angeles.Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio.Seattle Children's Hospital, Washington.Texas Children's Hospital.UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, California.The Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri.Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio.The Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26449565

Citation

Payne, Daniel C., et al. "Long-term Consistency in Rotavirus Vaccine Protection: RV5 and RV1 Vaccine Effectiveness in US Children, 2012-2013." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 61, no. 12, 2015, pp. 1792-9.
Payne DC, Selvarangan R, Azimi PH, et al. Long-term Consistency in Rotavirus Vaccine Protection: RV5 and RV1 Vaccine Effectiveness in US Children, 2012-2013. Clin Infect Dis. 2015;61(12):1792-9.
Payne, D. C., Selvarangan, R., Azimi, P. H., Boom, J. A., Englund, J. A., Staat, M. A., ... Parashar, U. D. (2015). Long-term Consistency in Rotavirus Vaccine Protection: RV5 and RV1 Vaccine Effectiveness in US Children, 2012-2013. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 61(12), pp. 1792-9. doi:10.1093/cid/civ872.
Payne DC, et al. Long-term Consistency in Rotavirus Vaccine Protection: RV5 and RV1 Vaccine Effectiveness in US Children, 2012-2013. Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Dec 15;61(12):1792-9. PubMed PMID: 26449565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term Consistency in Rotavirus Vaccine Protection: RV5 and RV1 Vaccine Effectiveness in US Children, 2012-2013. AU - Payne,Daniel C, AU - Selvarangan,Rangaraj, AU - Azimi,Parvin H, AU - Boom,Julie A, AU - Englund,Janet A, AU - Staat,Mary Allen, AU - Halasa,Natasha B, AU - Weinberg,Geoffrey A, AU - Szilagyi,Peter G, AU - Chappell,James, AU - McNeal,Monica, AU - Klein,Eileen J, AU - Sahni,Leila C, AU - Johnston,Samantha H, AU - Harrison,Christopher J, AU - Baker,Carol J, AU - Bernstein,David I, AU - Moffatt,Mary E, AU - Tate,Jacqueline E, AU - Mijatovic-Rustempasic,Slavica, AU - Esona,Mathew D, AU - Wikswo,Mary E, AU - Curns,Aaron T, AU - Sulemana,Iddrisu, AU - Bowen,Michael D, AU - Gentsch,Jon R, AU - Parashar,Umesh D, Y1 - 2015/10/08/ PY - 2015/06/19/received PY - 2015/09/24/accepted PY - 2015/10/10/entrez PY - 2015/10/10/pubmed PY - 2016/8/30/medline KW - RV1-Rotarix KW - RV5-RotaTeq KW - acute gastroenteritis KW - rotavirus vaccine KW - surveillance SP - 1792 EP - 9 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 61 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Using a multicenter, active surveillance network from 2 rotavirus seasons (2012 and 2013), we assessed the vaccine effectiveness of RV5 (RotaTeq) and RV1 (Rotarix) rotavirus vaccines in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits for numerous demographic and secular strata. METHODS: We enrolled children hospitalized or visiting the ED with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) for the 2012 and 2013 seasons at 7 medical institutions. Stool specimens were tested for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped, and rotavirus vaccination histories were compared for rotavirus-positive cases and rotavirus-negative AGE controls. We calculated the vaccine effectiveness (VE) for preventing rotavirus associated hospitalizations and ED visits for each vaccine, stratified by vaccine dose, season, clinical setting, age, predominant genotype, and ethnicity. RESULTS: RV5-specific VE analyses included 2961 subjects, 402 rotavirus cases (14%) and 2559 rotavirus-negative AGE controls. RV1-specific VE analyses included 904 subjects, 100 rotavirus cases (11%), and 804 rotavirus-negative AGE controls. Over the 2 rotavirus seasons, the VE for a complete 3-dose vaccination with RV5 was 80% (confidence interval [CI], 74%-84%), and VE for a complete 2-dose vaccination with RV1 was 80% (CI, 68%-88%).Statistically significant VE was observed for each year of life for which sufficient data allowed analysis (7 years for RV5 and 3 years for RV1). Both vaccines provided statistically significant genotype-specific protection against predominant circulating rotavirus strains. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, geographically and demographically diverse sample of US children, we observed that RV5 and RV1 rotavirus vaccines each provided a lasting and broadly heterologous protection against rotavirus gastroenteritis. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26449565/Long_term_Consistency_in_Rotavirus_Vaccine_Protection:_RV5_and_RV1_Vaccine_Effectiveness_in_US_Children_2012_2013_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/civ872 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -