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Visuospatial attention after traumatic brain injury: The role of hemispheric specialization.
Brain Inj. 2015; 29(13-14):1617-29.BI

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the behavioural and neural effects of TBI on the hemispheric integrity of three components of visuospatial attention: alerting, orienting and executive control.

METHOD

Behavioural performance and high density event-related potentials (ERPs) were acquired while a sample of 12 patients with chronic moderate-to-severe TBI and 12 controls performed the Lateralized Attention Network Test (LANT). Neural indices of attention (posterior N1 amplitude to alerting and orienting cues, midline P3 amplitude during conflict resolution) were examined.

RESULTS

Patients with TBI exhibited smaller N1 amplitude to alerting cues, but comparable behavioural performance to controls. Participants with TBI also demonstrated poorer orienting performance to the left hemispace relative to the right. A corresponding reduction in right hemisphere N1 was found during left orienting to spatial cues in the TBI group. No group differences were observed on behavioural measures of executive control; however, patients with TBI exhibited reduced P3 amplitude overall.

CONCLUSIONS

TBI may have an enduring effect on the orienting system at both neural and behavioural levels. Assessment of attention in chronic TBI can be improved by the integration of hemispheric findings that suggest disproportionate vulnerability in leftward orienting. Results may enhance clinical sensitivity to detection of subtle signs of neglect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA .a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA .b VA Northern California Health Care System , Martinez , CA , USA , and.a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA . c VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation and Research Center of Excellence , Malcom Randall VA, Gainesville, FL , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26451899

Citation

Hill-Jarrett, Tanisha G., et al. "Visuospatial Attention After Traumatic Brain Injury: the Role of Hemispheric Specialization." Brain Injury, vol. 29, no. 13-14, 2015, pp. 1617-29.
Hill-Jarrett TG, Gravano JT, Sozda CN, et al. Visuospatial attention after traumatic brain injury: The role of hemispheric specialization. Brain Inj. 2015;29(13-14):1617-29.
Hill-Jarrett, T. G., Gravano, J. T., Sozda, C. N., & Perlstein, W. M. (2015). Visuospatial attention after traumatic brain injury: The role of hemispheric specialization. Brain Injury, 29(13-14), 1617-29. https://doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2015.1075155
Hill-Jarrett TG, et al. Visuospatial Attention After Traumatic Brain Injury: the Role of Hemispheric Specialization. Brain Inj. 2015;29(13-14):1617-29. PubMed PMID: 26451899.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Visuospatial attention after traumatic brain injury: The role of hemispheric specialization. AU - Hill-Jarrett,Tanisha G, AU - Gravano,Jason T, AU - Sozda,Christopher N, AU - Perlstein,William M, Y1 - 2015/10/09/ PY - 2015/10/10/entrez PY - 2015/10/10/pubmed PY - 2016/10/25/medline KW - Attention KW - Lateralized Attention Network Test KW - cognition KW - event-related potential (ERP) KW - laterality KW - orienting KW - traumatic brain injury KW - visuospatial SP - 1617 EP - 29 JF - Brain injury JO - Brain Inj VL - 29 IS - 13-14 N2 - PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the behavioural and neural effects of TBI on the hemispheric integrity of three components of visuospatial attention: alerting, orienting and executive control. METHOD: Behavioural performance and high density event-related potentials (ERPs) were acquired while a sample of 12 patients with chronic moderate-to-severe TBI and 12 controls performed the Lateralized Attention Network Test (LANT). Neural indices of attention (posterior N1 amplitude to alerting and orienting cues, midline P3 amplitude during conflict resolution) were examined. RESULTS: Patients with TBI exhibited smaller N1 amplitude to alerting cues, but comparable behavioural performance to controls. Participants with TBI also demonstrated poorer orienting performance to the left hemispace relative to the right. A corresponding reduction in right hemisphere N1 was found during left orienting to spatial cues in the TBI group. No group differences were observed on behavioural measures of executive control; however, patients with TBI exhibited reduced P3 amplitude overall. CONCLUSIONS: TBI may have an enduring effect on the orienting system at both neural and behavioural levels. Assessment of attention in chronic TBI can be improved by the integration of hemispheric findings that suggest disproportionate vulnerability in leftward orienting. Results may enhance clinical sensitivity to detection of subtle signs of neglect. SN - 1362-301X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26451899/Visuospatial_attention_after_traumatic_brain_injury:_The_role_of_hemispheric_specialization_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/02699052.2015.1075155 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -