Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

What happens when you tell someone you self-injure? The effects of disclosing NSSI to adults and peers.
BMC Public Health. 2015 Oct 09; 15:1039.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with significant adverse consequences, including increased risk of suicide, and is a growing public health concern. Consequently, facilitating help-seeking in youth who self-injure is an important goal. Although young people who disclose their NSSI typically confide in peers and family, it is unclear how this disclosure and related variables (e.g. support from family and friends, coping behaviours, reasons for living) affect help-seeking over time. The aim of this study was to advance understanding of the impact of disclosure of NSSI by young people and to investigate these effects over time.

METHODS

A sample of 2637 adolescents completed self-report questionnaires at three time points, one year apart.

RESULTS

Of the sample, 526 reported a history of NSSI and 308 of those who self-injured had disclosed their behaviour to someone else, most commonly friends and parents.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, we observed that disclosure of NSSI to parents facilitates informal help-seeking, improves coping and reduces suicidality, but that disclosure to peers might reduce perceived social support and encourage NSSI in others. We discuss these findings in light of their clinical and research implications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA, 6845, Australia. Penelope.Hasking@curtin.edu.au. Department of Psychiatry, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Penelope.Hasking@curtin.edu.au.School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA, 6845, Australia. C.Rees@curtin.edu.au.Centre for Clinical Psychiatry and Neuroscience, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia. Graham.Martin@uq.edu.au.School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA, 6845, Australia. Jessie.Quigley@graduate.curtin.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26453187

Citation

Hasking, Penelope, et al. "What Happens when You Tell Someone You Self-injure? the Effects of Disclosing NSSI to Adults and Peers." BMC Public Health, vol. 15, 2015, p. 1039.
Hasking P, Rees CS, Martin G, et al. What happens when you tell someone you self-injure? The effects of disclosing NSSI to adults and peers. BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1039.
Hasking, P., Rees, C. S., Martin, G., & Quigley, J. (2015). What happens when you tell someone you self-injure? The effects of disclosing NSSI to adults and peers. BMC Public Health, 15, 1039. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-2383-0
Hasking P, et al. What Happens when You Tell Someone You Self-injure? the Effects of Disclosing NSSI to Adults and Peers. BMC Public Health. 2015 Oct 9;15:1039. PubMed PMID: 26453187.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What happens when you tell someone you self-injure? The effects of disclosing NSSI to adults and peers. AU - Hasking,Penelope, AU - Rees,Clare S, AU - Martin,Graham, AU - Quigley,Jessie, Y1 - 2015/10/09/ PY - 2015/05/28/received PY - 2015/10/05/accepted PY - 2015/10/11/entrez PY - 2015/10/11/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline SP - 1039 EP - 1039 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with significant adverse consequences, including increased risk of suicide, and is a growing public health concern. Consequently, facilitating help-seeking in youth who self-injure is an important goal. Although young people who disclose their NSSI typically confide in peers and family, it is unclear how this disclosure and related variables (e.g. support from family and friends, coping behaviours, reasons for living) affect help-seeking over time. The aim of this study was to advance understanding of the impact of disclosure of NSSI by young people and to investigate these effects over time. METHODS: A sample of 2637 adolescents completed self-report questionnaires at three time points, one year apart. RESULTS: Of the sample, 526 reported a history of NSSI and 308 of those who self-injured had disclosed their behaviour to someone else, most commonly friends and parents. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we observed that disclosure of NSSI to parents facilitates informal help-seeking, improves coping and reduces suicidality, but that disclosure to peers might reduce perceived social support and encourage NSSI in others. We discuss these findings in light of their clinical and research implications. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26453187/What_happens_when_you_tell_someone_you_self_injure_The_effects_of_disclosing_NSSI_to_adults_and_peers_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-015-2383-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -