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Maternal depressive symptoms, toddler emotion regulation, and subsequent emotion socialization.
J Fam Psychol. 2016 Mar; 30(2):276-85.JF

Abstract

Although many studies have examined how maternal depressive symptoms relate to parenting outcomes, less work has examined how symptoms affect emotion socialization, a parenting construct linked to a myriad of socioemotional outcomes in early childhood. In line with a transactional perspective on the family, it is also important to understand how children contribute to these emotional processes. The current study examined how toddler emotion regulation strategies moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization responses, including nonsupportive responses (e.g., minimizing, responding punitively to children's negative emotions) and wish-granting, or the degree to which mothers give in to their children's demands in order to decrease their children's and their own distress. Mothers (n = 91) and their 24-month-old toddlers participated in laboratory tasks from which toddler emotion regulation behaviors were observed. Mothers reported depressive symptoms and use of maladaptive emotion socialization strategies concurrently and at a 1-year follow-up. The predictive relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization was then examined in the context of toddlers' emotion regulation. Toddlers' increased use of caregiver-focused regulation interacted with depressive symptoms in predicting increased wish-granting socialization responses at 36 months. At high levels of toddlers' caregiver-focused regulation, depressive symptoms related to increased wish-granting socialization at 36 months. There was no relation for nonsupportive socialization responses. Results suggest that toddler emotional characteristics influence how depressive symptoms may put mothers at risk for maladaptive parenting. Family psychologists must strive to understand the role of both parent and toddler characteristics within problematic emotional interactions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Miami University.Department of Psychology, Miami University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26461486

Citation

Premo, Julie E., and Elizabeth J. Kiel. "Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Toddler Emotion Regulation, and Subsequent Emotion Socialization." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 30, no. 2, 2016, pp. 276-85.
Premo JE, Kiel EJ. Maternal depressive symptoms, toddler emotion regulation, and subsequent emotion socialization. J Fam Psychol. 2016;30(2):276-85.
Premo, J. E., & Kiel, E. J. (2016). Maternal depressive symptoms, toddler emotion regulation, and subsequent emotion socialization. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 30(2), 276-85. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000165
Premo JE, Kiel EJ. Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Toddler Emotion Regulation, and Subsequent Emotion Socialization. J Fam Psychol. 2016;30(2):276-85. PubMed PMID: 26461486.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal depressive symptoms, toddler emotion regulation, and subsequent emotion socialization. AU - Premo,Julie E, AU - Kiel,Elizabeth J, Y1 - 2015/10/12/ PY - 2017/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2015/10/14/entrez PY - 2015/10/16/pubmed PY - 2016/9/27/medline SP - 276 EP - 85 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - Although many studies have examined how maternal depressive symptoms relate to parenting outcomes, less work has examined how symptoms affect emotion socialization, a parenting construct linked to a myriad of socioemotional outcomes in early childhood. In line with a transactional perspective on the family, it is also important to understand how children contribute to these emotional processes. The current study examined how toddler emotion regulation strategies moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization responses, including nonsupportive responses (e.g., minimizing, responding punitively to children's negative emotions) and wish-granting, or the degree to which mothers give in to their children's demands in order to decrease their children's and their own distress. Mothers (n = 91) and their 24-month-old toddlers participated in laboratory tasks from which toddler emotion regulation behaviors were observed. Mothers reported depressive symptoms and use of maladaptive emotion socialization strategies concurrently and at a 1-year follow-up. The predictive relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization was then examined in the context of toddlers' emotion regulation. Toddlers' increased use of caregiver-focused regulation interacted with depressive symptoms in predicting increased wish-granting socialization responses at 36 months. At high levels of toddlers' caregiver-focused regulation, depressive symptoms related to increased wish-granting socialization at 36 months. There was no relation for nonsupportive socialization responses. Results suggest that toddler emotional characteristics influence how depressive symptoms may put mothers at risk for maladaptive parenting. Family psychologists must strive to understand the role of both parent and toddler characteristics within problematic emotional interactions. SN - 1939-1293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26461486/Maternal_depressive_symptoms_toddler_emotion_regulation_and_subsequent_emotion_socialization_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/30/2/276 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -