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Total, Dietary, and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones.
Am J Kidney Dis 2016; 67(3):400-7AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies of vitamin C and kidney stones were conducted mostly in men and either reported disparate results for supplemental and dietary vitamin C or did not examine dietary vitamin C.

STUDY DESIGN

Prospective cohort analysis.

SETTING & PARTICIPANTS

156,735 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and II and 40,536 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS).

PREDICTOR

Total, dietary, and supplemental vitamin C intake, adjusted for age, body mass index, thiazide use, and dietary factors.

OUTCOMES

Incident kidney stones.

RESULTS

During a median follow-up of 11.3 to 11.7 years, 6,245 incident kidney stones were identified. After multivariable adjustment, total vitamin C intake (<90 [reference], 90-249, 250-499, 500-999, and ≥1,000mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HRs of 1.00 [reference], 1.19 [95% CI, 0.99-1.46], 1.15 [95% CI, 0.93-1.42], 1.29 [95% CI, 1.04-1.60], and 1.43 [95% CI, 1.15-1.79], respectively; P for trend = 0.005). Median total vitamin C intake for the 500- to 999-mg/d category was ∼700mg/d. Supplemental vitamin C intake (no use [reference], <500, 500-999, and ≥1,000mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.01-1.40] for ≥1,000mg/d; P for trend = 0.001). Dietary vitamin C intake was not associated with stones among men or women, although few participants had dietary intakes > 700mg/d.

LIMITATIONS

Nutrient intakes derived from food-frequency questionnaires, lack of data on stone composition for all cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Total and supplemental vitamin C intake was significantly associated with higher risk for incident kidney stones in men, but not in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medical Sciences, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address: manuel.ferraro@channing.harvard.edu.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Division of Nephrology, Department of Medical Sciences, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26463139

Citation

Ferraro, Pietro Manuel, et al. "Total, Dietary, and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones." American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 67, no. 3, 2016, pp. 400-7.
Ferraro PM, Curhan GC, Gambaro G, et al. Total, Dietary, and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. Am J Kidney Dis. 2016;67(3):400-7.
Ferraro, P. M., Curhan, G. C., Gambaro, G., & Taylor, E. N. (2016). Total, Dietary, and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 67(3), pp. 400-7. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2015.09.005.
Ferraro PM, et al. Total, Dietary, and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. Am J Kidney Dis. 2016;67(3):400-7. PubMed PMID: 26463139.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total, Dietary, and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. AU - Ferraro,Pietro Manuel, AU - Curhan,Gary C, AU - Gambaro,Giovanni, AU - Taylor,Eric N, Y1 - 2015/10/14/ PY - 2015/06/04/received PY - 2015/09/01/accepted PY - 2017/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2015/10/15/entrez PY - 2015/10/16/pubmed PY - 2016/7/9/medline KW - Kidney disease KW - ascorbic acid KW - calcium oxalate KW - diet KW - food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) KW - gender difference KW - incident kidney stone KW - kidney stone formation KW - nutrition KW - risk factor KW - supplements KW - urinary oxalate excretion KW - urolithiasis KW - vitamin C SP - 400 EP - 7 JF - American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation JO - Am. J. Kidney Dis. VL - 67 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies of vitamin C and kidney stones were conducted mostly in men and either reported disparate results for supplemental and dietary vitamin C or did not examine dietary vitamin C. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort analysis. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 156,735 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and II and 40,536 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). PREDICTOR: Total, dietary, and supplemental vitamin C intake, adjusted for age, body mass index, thiazide use, and dietary factors. OUTCOMES: Incident kidney stones. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 11.3 to 11.7 years, 6,245 incident kidney stones were identified. After multivariable adjustment, total vitamin C intake (<90 [reference], 90-249, 250-499, 500-999, and ≥1,000mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HRs of 1.00 [reference], 1.19 [95% CI, 0.99-1.46], 1.15 [95% CI, 0.93-1.42], 1.29 [95% CI, 1.04-1.60], and 1.43 [95% CI, 1.15-1.79], respectively; P for trend = 0.005). Median total vitamin C intake for the 500- to 999-mg/d category was ∼700mg/d. Supplemental vitamin C intake (no use [reference], <500, 500-999, and ≥1,000mg/d) was not significantly associated with risk for kidney stones among women, but was among men (HR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.01-1.40] for ≥1,000mg/d; P for trend = 0.001). Dietary vitamin C intake was not associated with stones among men or women, although few participants had dietary intakes > 700mg/d. LIMITATIONS: Nutrient intakes derived from food-frequency questionnaires, lack of data on stone composition for all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Total and supplemental vitamin C intake was significantly associated with higher risk for incident kidney stones in men, but not in women. SN - 1523-6838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26463139/Total_Dietary_and_Supplemental_Vitamin_C_Intake_and_Risk_of_Incident_Kidney_Stones_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272-6386(15)01163-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -