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An. gambiae gSG6-P1 evaluation as a proxy for human-vector contact in the Americas: a pilot study.
Parasit Vectors. 2015 Oct 13; 8:533.PV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

During blood meal, the female mosquito injects saliva able to elicit an immune response in the vertebrate. This immune response has been proven to reflect the intensity of exposure to mosquito bites and risk of infection for vector transmitted pathogens such as malaria. The peptide gSG6-P1 of An. gambiae saliva has been demonstrated to be antigenic and highly specific to Anopheles as a genus. However, the applicability of gSG6-P1 to measure exposure to different Anopheles species endemic in the Americas has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this pilot study was to test whether human participants living in American countries present antibodies able to recognize the gSG6-P1, and whether these antibodies are useful as a proxy for mosquito bite exposure and malaria risk.

METHODS

We tested human serum samples from Colombia, Chile, and the United States for the presence of IgG antibodies against gSG6-P1 by ELISA. Antibody concentrations were expressed as delta optical density (ΔOD) of each sera tested in duplicates. The difference in the antibody concentrations between groups was tested using the nonparametric Mann Whitney test (independent groups) and the nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test (dependent groups). All differences were considered significant with a P < 0.05.

RESULTS

We found that the concentration of gSG6-P1 antibodies was significantly correlated with malaria infection status and mosquito bite exposure history. People with clinical malaria presented significantly higher concentrations of IgG anti-gSG6-P1 antibodies than healthy controls. Additionally, a significant raise in antibody concentrations was observed in subjects returning from malaria endemic areas.

CONCLUSION

Our data shows that gSG6-P1 is a suitable candidate for the evaluation of exposure to Anopheles mosquito bites, risk of malaria transmission, and effectiveness of protection measures against mosquito bites in the Americas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. blondono@uscmed.sc.edu. Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 6439 Garners Ferry Rd, Bldg 2 Rm C3, Columbia, SC, 29209, USA. blondono@uscmed.sc.edu.Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institutes of Health, NIAID, Bethesda, MD, USA. dramepm@niaid.nih.gov.Laboratorio Clínico/Programa Medicina del Viajero, Clínica Alemana, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile. thomas.weitzel@gmail.com.Hospital Militar, Santiago, Chile. reinaldo.rosas@gmail.com.Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA. cgrippin@tulane.edu.Hospital Los Patios, Los Patios, Norte de Santander, Colombia. carocardenasg@hotmail.com.Hospital Emiro Quintero Canizales, Ocana, Norte de Santander, Colombia. marcealvareza@gmail.com.Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA. wesson@tulane.edu.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement-IRD, Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire. anne.poinsignon@ird.fr.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement-IRD, Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire. franck.remoue@ird.fr.Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Tonya.Colpitts@uscmed.sc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26464073

Citation

Londono-Renteria, Berlin, et al. "An. Gambiae gSG6-P1 Evaluation as a Proxy for Human-vector Contact in the Americas: a Pilot Study." Parasites & Vectors, vol. 8, 2015, p. 533.
Londono-Renteria B, Drame PM, Weitzel T, et al. An. gambiae gSG6-P1 evaluation as a proxy for human-vector contact in the Americas: a pilot study. Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:533.
Londono-Renteria, B., Drame, P. M., Weitzel, T., Rosas, R., Gripping, C., Cardenas, J. C., Alvares, M., Wesson, D. M., Poinsignon, A., Remoue, F., & Colpitts, T. M. (2015). An. gambiae gSG6-P1 evaluation as a proxy for human-vector contact in the Americas: a pilot study. Parasites & Vectors, 8, 533. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-015-1160-3
Londono-Renteria B, et al. An. Gambiae gSG6-P1 Evaluation as a Proxy for Human-vector Contact in the Americas: a Pilot Study. Parasit Vectors. 2015 Oct 13;8:533. PubMed PMID: 26464073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An. gambiae gSG6-P1 evaluation as a proxy for human-vector contact in the Americas: a pilot study. AU - Londono-Renteria,Berlin, AU - Drame,Papa M, AU - Weitzel,Thomas, AU - Rosas,Reinaldo, AU - Gripping,Crystal, AU - Cardenas,Jenny C, AU - Alvares,Marcela, AU - Wesson,Dawn M, AU - Poinsignon,Anne, AU - Remoue,Franck, AU - Colpitts,Tonya M, Y1 - 2015/10/13/ PY - 2015/08/19/received PY - 2015/10/08/accepted PY - 2015/10/15/entrez PY - 2015/10/16/pubmed PY - 2016/4/15/medline SP - 533 EP - 533 JF - Parasites & vectors JO - Parasit Vectors VL - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: During blood meal, the female mosquito injects saliva able to elicit an immune response in the vertebrate. This immune response has been proven to reflect the intensity of exposure to mosquito bites and risk of infection for vector transmitted pathogens such as malaria. The peptide gSG6-P1 of An. gambiae saliva has been demonstrated to be antigenic and highly specific to Anopheles as a genus. However, the applicability of gSG6-P1 to measure exposure to different Anopheles species endemic in the Americas has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this pilot study was to test whether human participants living in American countries present antibodies able to recognize the gSG6-P1, and whether these antibodies are useful as a proxy for mosquito bite exposure and malaria risk. METHODS: We tested human serum samples from Colombia, Chile, and the United States for the presence of IgG antibodies against gSG6-P1 by ELISA. Antibody concentrations were expressed as delta optical density (ΔOD) of each sera tested in duplicates. The difference in the antibody concentrations between groups was tested using the nonparametric Mann Whitney test (independent groups) and the nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test (dependent groups). All differences were considered significant with a P < 0.05. RESULTS: We found that the concentration of gSG6-P1 antibodies was significantly correlated with malaria infection status and mosquito bite exposure history. People with clinical malaria presented significantly higher concentrations of IgG anti-gSG6-P1 antibodies than healthy controls. Additionally, a significant raise in antibody concentrations was observed in subjects returning from malaria endemic areas. CONCLUSION: Our data shows that gSG6-P1 is a suitable candidate for the evaluation of exposure to Anopheles mosquito bites, risk of malaria transmission, and effectiveness of protection measures against mosquito bites in the Americas. SN - 1756-3305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26464073/An__gambiae_gSG6_P1_evaluation_as_a_proxy_for_human_vector_contact_in_the_Americas:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-015-1160-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -