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Prevalence and Functional Consequences of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Male Ice Hockey Players.
Am J Sports Med 2016; 44(1):46-53AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), which is highly prevalent in adult ice hockey players, is often associated with negative clinical and functional outcomes. It is unclear, however, whether FAI-related bony deformities and symptoms may lead to functional alterations as reflected in hip muscle strength, range of motion (ROM), and on-ice physical performance in youth ice hockey players.

HYPOTHESIS

Compared with players with neither structural signs nor symptoms related to FAI, players with symptomatic FAI would show hip muscle weakness and reduced hip ROM, which would in turn affect ice hockey physical performance.

STUDY DESIGN

Controlled laboratory study.

METHODS

A total of 74 young male ice hockey players were evaluated bilaterally for passive hip internal rotation ROM by use of a hip examination chair. Only the side with less internal rotation ROM was further investigated. FAI-related bony deformities were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The involved hip was classified as symptomatic or asymptomatic based on the presence of hip pain during exercise and results from the flexion/adduction/internal rotation (FADIR) provocation test. Hip muscle strength, passive hip ROM, and on-ice physical performance were compared between players with no FAI, players with asymptomatic MRI-positive FAI, and players with symptomatic FAI.

RESULTS

Fifty of 74 players (68%) had FAI-related bony deformities, of whom 16 (22%) were symptomatic. Hip muscle strength, hip ROM, and on-ice physical performance did not differ significantly between players with no FAI and those with asymptomatic or symptomatic FAI.

CONCLUSION

Despite a high prevalence of FAI-related bony deformities, youth ice hockey players with asymptomatic or symptomatic FAI did not show functional impairments in terms of hip muscle strength, hip ROM, or on-ice physical performance.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Hip muscle strength, passive hip ROM, and on-ice physical performance do not seem to discriminate for FAI-related signs and symptoms in young male ice hockey players.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), Winterthur, Switzerland.Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland nicola.maffiuletti@kws.ch.Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Radiology, Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich, Switzerland Faculty of Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Radiology, Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich, Switzerland Faculty of Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Orthopaedics, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26464494

Citation

Brunner, Romana, et al. "Prevalence and Functional Consequences of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Male Ice Hockey Players." The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 44, no. 1, 2016, pp. 46-53.
Brunner R, Maffiuletti NA, Casartelli NC, et al. Prevalence and Functional Consequences of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Male Ice Hockey Players. Am J Sports Med. 2016;44(1):46-53.
Brunner, R., Maffiuletti, N. A., Casartelli, N. C., Bizzini, M., Sutter, R., Pfirrmann, C. W., & Leunig, M. (2016). Prevalence and Functional Consequences of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Male Ice Hockey Players. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 44(1), pp. 46-53. doi:10.1177/0363546515607000.
Brunner R, et al. Prevalence and Functional Consequences of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Male Ice Hockey Players. Am J Sports Med. 2016;44(1):46-53. PubMed PMID: 26464494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and Functional Consequences of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Male Ice Hockey Players. AU - Brunner,Romana, AU - Maffiuletti,Nicola A, AU - Casartelli,Nicola C, AU - Bizzini,Mario, AU - Sutter,Reto, AU - Pfirrmann,Christian W, AU - Leunig,Michael, Y1 - 2015/10/13/ PY - 2015/10/15/entrez PY - 2015/10/16/pubmed PY - 2016/7/28/medline KW - femoroacetabular impingement KW - ice hockey KW - muscle strength KW - physical performance KW - range of motion SP - 46 EP - 53 JF - The American journal of sports medicine JO - Am J Sports Med VL - 44 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), which is highly prevalent in adult ice hockey players, is often associated with negative clinical and functional outcomes. It is unclear, however, whether FAI-related bony deformities and symptoms may lead to functional alterations as reflected in hip muscle strength, range of motion (ROM), and on-ice physical performance in youth ice hockey players. HYPOTHESIS: Compared with players with neither structural signs nor symptoms related to FAI, players with symptomatic FAI would show hip muscle weakness and reduced hip ROM, which would in turn affect ice hockey physical performance. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: A total of 74 young male ice hockey players were evaluated bilaterally for passive hip internal rotation ROM by use of a hip examination chair. Only the side with less internal rotation ROM was further investigated. FAI-related bony deformities were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The involved hip was classified as symptomatic or asymptomatic based on the presence of hip pain during exercise and results from the flexion/adduction/internal rotation (FADIR) provocation test. Hip muscle strength, passive hip ROM, and on-ice physical performance were compared between players with no FAI, players with asymptomatic MRI-positive FAI, and players with symptomatic FAI. RESULTS: Fifty of 74 players (68%) had FAI-related bony deformities, of whom 16 (22%) were symptomatic. Hip muscle strength, hip ROM, and on-ice physical performance did not differ significantly between players with no FAI and those with asymptomatic or symptomatic FAI. CONCLUSION: Despite a high prevalence of FAI-related bony deformities, youth ice hockey players with asymptomatic or symptomatic FAI did not show functional impairments in terms of hip muscle strength, hip ROM, or on-ice physical performance. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Hip muscle strength, passive hip ROM, and on-ice physical performance do not seem to discriminate for FAI-related signs and symptoms in young male ice hockey players. SN - 1552-3365 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26464494/Prevalence_and_Functional_Consequences_of_Femoroacetabular_Impingement_in_Young_Male_Ice_Hockey_Players_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546515607000?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -