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HtpG contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium intestinal persistence in pigs.
Vet Res. 2015 Oct 14; 46:118.VR

Abstract

Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) contamination of pork, is one of the major sources of human salmonellosis. The bacterium is able to persist and hide in asymptomatic carrier animals, generating a reservoir for Salmonella transmission to other animals and humans. Mechanisms involved in Salmonella persistence in pigs remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Salmonella htpG gene, encoding a homologue of the eukaryotic heat shock protein 90, contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in intestine-associated tissues of pigs, but not in the tonsils. HtpG does not seem to play an important role during the acute phase of infection. The contribution to persistence was shown to be associated with htpG-dependent Salmonella invasion and survival in porcine enterocytes and macrophages. These results reveal the role of HtpG as a virulence factor contributing to Salmonella persistence in pigs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Elin.verbrugghe@ugent.be.Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Alexander.vanparys@ugent.be. Department of Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. Alexander.vanparys@ugent.be.Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Bregje.leyman@ugent.be. Department of Nutrition, Genetics and Ethology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Bregje.leyman@ugent.be.Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Filip.boyen@ugent.be.Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Freddy.haesebrouck@ugent.be.Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Frank.pasmans@ugent.be.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26466674

Citation

Verbrugghe, Elin, et al. "HtpG Contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium Intestinal Persistence in Pigs." Veterinary Research, vol. 46, 2015, p. 118.
Verbrugghe E, Van Parys A, Leyman B, et al. HtpG contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium intestinal persistence in pigs. Vet Res. 2015;46:118.
Verbrugghe, E., Van Parys, A., Leyman, B., Boyen, F., Haesebrouck, F., & Pasmans, F. (2015). HtpG contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium intestinal persistence in pigs. Veterinary Research, 46, 118. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-015-0261-5
Verbrugghe E, et al. HtpG Contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium Intestinal Persistence in Pigs. Vet Res. 2015 Oct 14;46:118. PubMed PMID: 26466674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HtpG contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium intestinal persistence in pigs. AU - Verbrugghe,Elin, AU - Van Parys,Alexander, AU - Leyman,Bregje, AU - Boyen,Filip, AU - Haesebrouck,Freddy, AU - Pasmans,Frank, Y1 - 2015/10/14/ PY - 2015/06/19/received PY - 2015/09/30/accepted PY - 2015/10/16/entrez PY - 2015/10/16/pubmed PY - 2016/7/15/medline SP - 118 EP - 118 JF - Veterinary research JO - Vet Res VL - 46 N2 - Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) contamination of pork, is one of the major sources of human salmonellosis. The bacterium is able to persist and hide in asymptomatic carrier animals, generating a reservoir for Salmonella transmission to other animals and humans. Mechanisms involved in Salmonella persistence in pigs remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Salmonella htpG gene, encoding a homologue of the eukaryotic heat shock protein 90, contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in intestine-associated tissues of pigs, but not in the tonsils. HtpG does not seem to play an important role during the acute phase of infection. The contribution to persistence was shown to be associated with htpG-dependent Salmonella invasion and survival in porcine enterocytes and macrophages. These results reveal the role of HtpG as a virulence factor contributing to Salmonella persistence in pigs. SN - 1297-9716 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26466674/HtpG_contributes_to_Salmonella_Typhimurium_intestinal_persistence_in_pigs_ L2 - https://veterinaryresearch.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13567-015-0261-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -