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Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and its determinants in the very old: the Newcastle 85+ Study.
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Mar; 27(3):1199-1208.OI

Abstract

SUMMARY

Data on vitamin D status in very old adults are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and its predictors in 775 adults aged 85 years old living in North-East England. Low 25(OH)D was alarmingly high during winter/spring months, but its biological significance is unknown.

INTRODUCTION

Despite recent concerns about the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in much of the British adult and paediatric population, there is a dearth of data on vitamin D status and its predictors in very old adults. The objective of the present study was to describe vitamin D status and its associated factors in a broadly representative sample of very old men and women aged 85 years living in the North East of England (55° N).

METHODS

Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were analysed in 775 participants in the baseline phase of the Newcastle 85+ cohort study. Season of blood sampling, dietary, health, lifestyle and anthropometric data were collected and included as potential predictors of vitamin D status in ordinal regression models.

RESULTS

Median serum 25(OH)D concentrations were 27, 45, 43 and 33 nmol/L during spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency according to North American Institute of Medicine guidelines [serum 25(OH)D <30 nmol/L] varied significantly with season with the highest prevalence observed in spring (51%) and the lowest prevalence observed in autumn (23%; P < 0.001). Reported median (inter-quartile range) dietary intakes of vitamin D were very low at 2.9 (1.2-3.3) μg/day. In multivariate ordinal regression models, non-users of either prescribed or non-prescribed vitamin D preparations and winter and spring blood sampling were associated with lower 25(OH)D concentrations. Dietary vitamin D intake, disability score and disease count were not independently associated with vitamin D status in the cohort.

CONCLUSION

There is an alarming high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<30 nmol/L) in 85-year-olds living in North East England at all times of the year but particularly during winter and spring. Use of vitamin D containing preparations (both supplements and medications) appeared to be the strongest predictor of 25(OH)D concentrations in these very old adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Tom.Hill@ncl.ac.uk. School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. Tom.Hill@ncl.ac.uk. Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. Tom.Hill@ncl.ac.uk.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Institute for Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Institute for Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. Institute for Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. Institute for Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. Institute for Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Institute for Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 3BZ, UK.Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 3BZ, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Institute for Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26468040

Citation

Hill, T R., et al. "Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Its Determinants in the Very Old: the Newcastle 85+ Study." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 27, no. 3, 2016, pp. 1199-1208.
Hill TR, Granic A, Davies K, et al. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and its determinants in the very old: the Newcastle 85+ Study. Osteoporos Int. 2016;27(3):1199-1208.
Hill, T. R., Granic, A., Davies, K., Collerton, J., Martin-Ruiz, C., Siervo, M., Mathers, J. C., Adamson, A. J., Francis, R. M., Pearce, S. H., Razvi, S., Kirkwood, T. B. L., & Jagger, C. (2016). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and its determinants in the very old: the Newcastle 85+ Study. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 27(3), 1199-1208. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-015-3366-9
Hill TR, et al. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Its Determinants in the Very Old: the Newcastle 85+ Study. Osteoporos Int. 2016;27(3):1199-1208. PubMed PMID: 26468040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and its determinants in the very old: the Newcastle 85+ Study. AU - Hill,T R, AU - Granic,A, AU - Davies,K, AU - Collerton,J, AU - Martin-Ruiz,C, AU - Siervo,M, AU - Mathers,J C, AU - Adamson,A J, AU - Francis,R M, AU - Pearce,S H, AU - Razvi,S, AU - Kirkwood,T B L, AU - Jagger,C, Y1 - 2015/10/14/ PY - 2015/04/13/received PY - 2015/10/05/accepted PY - 2015/10/16/entrez PY - 2015/10/16/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Aged 80 and over KW - Determinants KW - Newcastle 85+ cohort study KW - Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D SP - 1199 EP - 1208 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - SUMMARY: Data on vitamin D status in very old adults are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and its predictors in 775 adults aged 85 years old living in North-East England. Low 25(OH)D was alarmingly high during winter/spring months, but its biological significance is unknown. INTRODUCTION: Despite recent concerns about the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in much of the British adult and paediatric population, there is a dearth of data on vitamin D status and its predictors in very old adults. The objective of the present study was to describe vitamin D status and its associated factors in a broadly representative sample of very old men and women aged 85 years living in the North East of England (55° N). METHODS: Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were analysed in 775 participants in the baseline phase of the Newcastle 85+ cohort study. Season of blood sampling, dietary, health, lifestyle and anthropometric data were collected and included as potential predictors of vitamin D status in ordinal regression models. RESULTS: Median serum 25(OH)D concentrations were 27, 45, 43 and 33 nmol/L during spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency according to North American Institute of Medicine guidelines [serum 25(OH)D <30 nmol/L] varied significantly with season with the highest prevalence observed in spring (51%) and the lowest prevalence observed in autumn (23%; P < 0.001). Reported median (inter-quartile range) dietary intakes of vitamin D were very low at 2.9 (1.2-3.3) μg/day. In multivariate ordinal regression models, non-users of either prescribed or non-prescribed vitamin D preparations and winter and spring blood sampling were associated with lower 25(OH)D concentrations. Dietary vitamin D intake, disability score and disease count were not independently associated with vitamin D status in the cohort. CONCLUSION: There is an alarming high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<30 nmol/L) in 85-year-olds living in North East England at all times of the year but particularly during winter and spring. Use of vitamin D containing preparations (both supplements and medications) appeared to be the strongest predictor of 25(OH)D concentrations in these very old adults. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26468040/Serum_25_hydroxyvitamin_D_concentration_and_its_determinants_in_the_very_old:_the_Newcastle_85+_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-015-3366-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -