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Effect of mitochondrial cofactors and antioxidants supplementation on cognition in the aged canine.
Neurobiol Aging. 2016 Jan; 37:171-178.NA

Abstract

A growing body of research has focused on modifiable risk factors for prevention and attenuation of cognitive decline in aging. This has led to an unprecedented interest in the relationship between diet and cognitive function. Several preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that dietary intervention can be used to improve cognitive function but randomized controlled trials are increasingly failing to replicate these findings. Here, we use a canine model of aging to evaluate the effects of specific components of diet supplementation which contain both antioxidants and a combination of mitochondrial cofactors (lipoic acid [LA] and acetyl-l-carnitine) on a battery of cognitive functions. Our data suggest that supplementation with mitochondrial cofactors, but not LA or antioxidant alone, selectively improve long-term recall in aged canines. Furthermore, we found evidence that LA alone could have cognitive impairing effects. These results contrast to those of a previous longitudinal study in aged canine. Our data demonstrate that one reason for this difference may be the nutritional status of animals at baseline for the 2 studies. Overall, this study suggests that social, cognitive, and physical activity together with optimal dietary intake (rather than diet alone) promotes successful brain aging.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address: ssnigdha@uci.edu.CanCog Technologies Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.CanCog Technologies Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26481404

Citation

Snigdha, Shikha, et al. "Effect of Mitochondrial Cofactors and Antioxidants Supplementation On Cognition in the Aged Canine." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 37, 2016, pp. 171-178.
Snigdha S, de Rivera C, Milgram NW, et al. Effect of mitochondrial cofactors and antioxidants supplementation on cognition in the aged canine. Neurobiol Aging. 2016;37:171-178.
Snigdha, S., de Rivera, C., Milgram, N. W., & Cotman, C. W. (2016). Effect of mitochondrial cofactors and antioxidants supplementation on cognition in the aged canine. Neurobiology of Aging, 37, 171-178. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.09.015
Snigdha S, et al. Effect of Mitochondrial Cofactors and Antioxidants Supplementation On Cognition in the Aged Canine. Neurobiol Aging. 2016;37:171-178. PubMed PMID: 26481404.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of mitochondrial cofactors and antioxidants supplementation on cognition in the aged canine. AU - Snigdha,Shikha, AU - de Rivera,Christina, AU - Milgram,Norton W, AU - Cotman,Carl W, Y1 - 2015/09/30/ PY - 2015/04/06/received PY - 2015/09/16/revised PY - 2015/09/19/accepted PY - 2015/10/21/entrez PY - 2015/10/21/pubmed PY - 2016/9/27/medline KW - Aging KW - Carnitine (ALCAR) KW - Cognition KW - Dietary supplement KW - Lipoic acid (LA) KW - Mitochondrial cofactor SP - 171 EP - 178 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol Aging VL - 37 N2 - A growing body of research has focused on modifiable risk factors for prevention and attenuation of cognitive decline in aging. This has led to an unprecedented interest in the relationship between diet and cognitive function. Several preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that dietary intervention can be used to improve cognitive function but randomized controlled trials are increasingly failing to replicate these findings. Here, we use a canine model of aging to evaluate the effects of specific components of diet supplementation which contain both antioxidants and a combination of mitochondrial cofactors (lipoic acid [LA] and acetyl-l-carnitine) on a battery of cognitive functions. Our data suggest that supplementation with mitochondrial cofactors, but not LA or antioxidant alone, selectively improve long-term recall in aged canines. Furthermore, we found evidence that LA alone could have cognitive impairing effects. These results contrast to those of a previous longitudinal study in aged canine. Our data demonstrate that one reason for this difference may be the nutritional status of animals at baseline for the 2 studies. Overall, this study suggests that social, cognitive, and physical activity together with optimal dietary intake (rather than diet alone) promotes successful brain aging. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26481404/Effect_of_mitochondrial_cofactors_and_antioxidants_supplementation_on_cognition_in_the_aged_canine_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(15)00472-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -