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The mental health of US Black women: the roles of social context and severe intimate partner violence.
BMJ Open. 2015 Oct 19; 5(10):e008415.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Black women continue to have rates of mental health conditions that can be negative for their well-being. This study examined the contribution of social and contextual factors and severe physical intimate partner violence on the mental health of US Black women (African-American and Caribbean Black).

SETTING

Data were largely collected via in-person community interviews at participants' homes.

PARTICIPANTS

We studied 3277 African-American and Black Caribbean women from the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the largest and most complete sample of Blacks residing in the USA.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES

Key outcomes included an array of psychiatric disorders based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV).

RESULTS

Bivariate results revealed noticeably high rates of any anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, any substance disorder, alcohol abuse disorder, suicide ideation and attempts, and any overall mental disorder among African-American women relative to Caribbean Black women. Multiple social and contextual factors were associated with various mental disorders among both sets of Black women in multivariate models, with the most consistent associations found for severe physical intimate partner violence. Everyday discrimination was associated with anxiety disorders (95% AOR=2.08 CI 1.23 to 3.51), eating disorders (95% AOR=2.69 CI 1.38 to 5.22), and any disorder (95% AOR=2.18 CI 1.40 to 3.40), while neighbourhood drug problems contributed to mood (95% AOR=1.19 CI 1.04 to 1.36), substance disorders (95% AOR=1.37 CI 1.11 to 1.69) and any disorder (95% AOR=1.18 CI 1.03 to 1.34).

CONCLUSIONS

Severe physical intimate partner violence, discrimination, and to a lesser extent, neighbourhood problems are important predictors of Black women's health, findings that inform intervention and clinical services tailored to meet the needs of Black women from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research, Program for Research on Black Americans, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy & Institute for Health, Health Care Policy & Aging Research, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26482770

Citation

Lacey, Krim K., et al. "The Mental Health of US Black Women: the Roles of Social Context and Severe Intimate Partner Violence." BMJ Open, vol. 5, no. 10, 2015, pp. e008415.
Lacey KK, Parnell R, Mouzon DM, et al. The mental health of US Black women: the roles of social context and severe intimate partner violence. BMJ Open. 2015;5(10):e008415.
Lacey, K. K., Parnell, R., Mouzon, D. M., Matusko, N., Head, D., Abelson, J. M., & Jackson, J. S. (2015). The mental health of US Black women: the roles of social context and severe intimate partner violence. BMJ Open, 5(10), e008415. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008415
Lacey KK, et al. The Mental Health of US Black Women: the Roles of Social Context and Severe Intimate Partner Violence. BMJ Open. 2015 Oct 19;5(10):e008415. PubMed PMID: 26482770.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The mental health of US Black women: the roles of social context and severe intimate partner violence. AU - Lacey,Krim K, AU - Parnell,Regina, AU - Mouzon,Dawne M, AU - Matusko,Niki, AU - Head,Doreen, AU - Abelson,Jamie M, AU - Jackson,James S, Y1 - 2015/10/19/ PY - 2015/10/21/entrez PY - 2015/10/21/pubmed PY - 2016/8/2/medline KW - PUBLIC HEALTH SP - e008415 EP - e008415 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 5 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Black women continue to have rates of mental health conditions that can be negative for their well-being. This study examined the contribution of social and contextual factors and severe physical intimate partner violence on the mental health of US Black women (African-American and Caribbean Black). SETTING: Data were largely collected via in-person community interviews at participants' homes. PARTICIPANTS: We studied 3277 African-American and Black Caribbean women from the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the largest and most complete sample of Blacks residing in the USA. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Key outcomes included an array of psychiatric disorders based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). RESULTS: Bivariate results revealed noticeably high rates of any anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, any substance disorder, alcohol abuse disorder, suicide ideation and attempts, and any overall mental disorder among African-American women relative to Caribbean Black women. Multiple social and contextual factors were associated with various mental disorders among both sets of Black women in multivariate models, with the most consistent associations found for severe physical intimate partner violence. Everyday discrimination was associated with anxiety disorders (95% AOR=2.08 CI 1.23 to 3.51), eating disorders (95% AOR=2.69 CI 1.38 to 5.22), and any disorder (95% AOR=2.18 CI 1.40 to 3.40), while neighbourhood drug problems contributed to mood (95% AOR=1.19 CI 1.04 to 1.36), substance disorders (95% AOR=1.37 CI 1.11 to 1.69) and any disorder (95% AOR=1.18 CI 1.03 to 1.34). CONCLUSIONS: Severe physical intimate partner violence, discrimination, and to a lesser extent, neighbourhood problems are important predictors of Black women's health, findings that inform intervention and clinical services tailored to meet the needs of Black women from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26482770/The_mental_health_of_US_Black_women:_the_roles_of_social_context_and_severe_intimate_partner_violence_ L2 - https://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26482770 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -