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Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated with Companion Animals.
Animals (Basel) 2011; 1(4):377-95A

Abstract

Understanding the zoonotic risk posed by poxviruses in companion animals is important for protecting both human and animal health. The outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, as well as current reports of cowpox in Europe, point to the fact that companion animals are increasingly serving as sources of poxvirus transmission to people. In addition, the trend among hobbyists to keep livestock (such as goats) in urban and semi-urban areas has contributed to increased parapoxvirus exposures among people not traditionally considered at high risk. Despite the historic notoriety of poxviruses and the diseases they cause, poxvirus infections are often missed. Delays in diagnosing poxvirus-associated infections in companion animals can lead to inadvertent human exposures. Delays in confirming human infections can result in inappropriate treatment or prolonged recovery. Early recognition of poxvirus-associated infections and application of appropriate preventive measures can reduce the spread of virus between companion animals and their owners. This review will discuss the epidemiology and clinical features associated with the zoonotic poxvirus infections most commonly associated with companion animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. dot7@cdc.gov. Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. dot7@cdc.gov.Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. nzr6@cdc.gov.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26486622

Citation

Tack, Danielle M., and Mary G. Reynolds. "Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated With Companion Animals." Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI, vol. 1, no. 4, 2011, pp. 377-95.
Tack DM, Reynolds MG. Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated with Companion Animals. Animals (Basel). 2011;1(4):377-95.
Tack, D. M., & Reynolds, M. G. (2011). Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated with Companion Animals. Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI, 1(4), pp. 377-95. doi:10.3390/ani1040377.
Tack DM, Reynolds MG. Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated With Companion Animals. Animals (Basel). 2011 Nov 17;1(4):377-95. PubMed PMID: 26486622.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated with Companion Animals. AU - Tack,Danielle M, AU - Reynolds,Mary G, Y1 - 2011/11/17/ PY - 2011/10/13/received PY - 2011/11/02/revised PY - 2011/11/15/accepted PY - 2015/10/22/entrez PY - 2011/1/1/pubmed PY - 2011/1/1/medline KW - companion animals KW - cowpox KW - monkeypox KW - orf KW - orthopoxvirus KW - parapoxvirus KW - poxvirus KW - zoonoses SP - 377 EP - 95 JF - Animals : an open access journal from MDPI JO - Animals (Basel) VL - 1 IS - 4 N2 - Understanding the zoonotic risk posed by poxviruses in companion animals is important for protecting both human and animal health. The outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, as well as current reports of cowpox in Europe, point to the fact that companion animals are increasingly serving as sources of poxvirus transmission to people. In addition, the trend among hobbyists to keep livestock (such as goats) in urban and semi-urban areas has contributed to increased parapoxvirus exposures among people not traditionally considered at high risk. Despite the historic notoriety of poxviruses and the diseases they cause, poxvirus infections are often missed. Delays in diagnosing poxvirus-associated infections in companion animals can lead to inadvertent human exposures. Delays in confirming human infections can result in inappropriate treatment or prolonged recovery. Early recognition of poxvirus-associated infections and application of appropriate preventive measures can reduce the spread of virus between companion animals and their owners. This review will discuss the epidemiology and clinical features associated with the zoonotic poxvirus infections most commonly associated with companion animals. SN - 2076-2615 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26486622/Zoonotic_Poxviruses_Associated_with_Companion_Animals_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ani1040377 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -