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Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load with Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014.
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Nov; 21(11):2029-35.EI

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a spectrum of illness. We evaluated whether cycle threshold (Ct) values (which are inversely related to virus load) were associated with clinical severity in patients from Saudi Arabia whose nasopharyngeal specimens tested positive for this virus by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Among 102 patients, median Ct of 31.0 for the upstream of the E gene target for 41 (40%) patients who died was significantly lower than the median of 33.0 for 61 survivors (p=0.0087). In multivariable regression analyses, risk factors for death were age>60 years), underlying illness, and decreasing Ct for each 1-point decrease in Ct). Results were similar for a composite severe outcome (death and/or intensive care unit admission). More data are needed to determine whether modulation of virus load by therapeutic agents affects clinical outcomes.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26488195

Citation

Feikin, Daniel R., et al. "Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load With Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 21, no. 11, 2015, pp. 2029-35.
Feikin DR, Alraddadi B, Qutub M, et al. Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load with Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infect Dis. 2015;21(11):2029-35.
Feikin, D. R., Alraddadi, B., Qutub, M., Shabouni, O., Curns, A., Oboho, I. K., Tomczyk, S. M., Wolff, B., Watson, J. T., & Madani, T. A. (2015). Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load with Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 21(11), 2029-35. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2111.150764
Feikin DR, et al. Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load With Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infect Dis. 2015;21(11):2029-35. PubMed PMID: 26488195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load with Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014. AU - Feikin,Daniel R, AU - Alraddadi,Basem, AU - Qutub,Mohammed, AU - Shabouni,Omaima, AU - Curns,Aaron, AU - Oboho,Ikwo K, AU - Tomczyk,Sara M, AU - Wolff,Bernard, AU - Watson,John T, AU - Madani,Tariq A, PY - 2015/10/22/entrez PY - 2015/10/22/pubmed PY - 2016/5/18/medline KW - MERS-CoV KW - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus KW - Saudi Arabia KW - virus load KW - viruses KW - zoonoses SP - 2029 EP - 35 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerging Infect. Dis. VL - 21 IS - 11 N2 - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a spectrum of illness. We evaluated whether cycle threshold (Ct) values (which are inversely related to virus load) were associated with clinical severity in patients from Saudi Arabia whose nasopharyngeal specimens tested positive for this virus by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Among 102 patients, median Ct of 31.0 for the upstream of the E gene target for 41 (40%) patients who died was significantly lower than the median of 33.0 for 61 survivors (p=0.0087). In multivariable regression analyses, risk factors for death were age>60 years), underlying illness, and decreasing Ct for each 1-point decrease in Ct). Results were similar for a composite severe outcome (death and/or intensive care unit admission). More data are needed to determine whether modulation of virus load by therapeutic agents affects clinical outcomes. SN - 1080-6059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26488195/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2111.150764 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -