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Dietary vitamin, mineral and herbal supplement use: a cross-sectional survey of before and during pregnancy use in Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

AIM

To describe the use of dietary vitamin, mineral and herbal supplements before and during pregnancy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Pregnant women attending for antenatal care at two tertiary Sydney hospitals between January and March 2014 completed an anonymous survey. Information on general maternal and pregnancy characteristics and the use of dietary and herbal supplements, including type, duration and sources of information, was collected. Frequency and contingency tabulations were performed.

RESULTS

A total of 612 women agreed to participate (91% response rate). Of 589 women included in the analysis, mean gestational age at the time of survey was 28.5 weeks (SD 8.3), 55% had no children, and 67% were tertiary-educated. Overall, 62.9% of women reported taking a multivitamin (MV) and/or folic acid (FA) supplement in the 3 months prepregnancy, and 97.5% took a MV and/or FA in the first trimester. At the time of the survey, 93.8% of women were taking at least one supplement (median 2, range 1-13). During pregnancy, 79.1% of women were taking MVs, including 59.2% taking MV only and 19.9% taking MV and FA. The five most common supplements outside of a MV were FA (31%), iron (30%), vitamin D (23%), calcium (13%) and fish oil (12%). Reported herbal supplement rates were low.

CONCLUSION

Folic acid, MVs and other supplements use during and prepregnancy is relatively high, although prepregnancy FA supplementation rates could still be improved. Further research on the actual dosages and dietary intakes consumed is needed to examine whether pregnant women have adequate intake of nutrients, regardless of supplement use.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Clinical and Population Perinatal Health Research, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Obstetrics, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia.

    ,

    Department of Obstetrics, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia.

    ,

    Clinical and Population Perinatal Health Research, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia. University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

    ,

    Clinical and Population Perinatal Health Research, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia.

    Clinical and Population Perinatal Health Research, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Calcium
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Fish Oils
    Folic Acid
    Humans
    Iron
    Minerals
    New South Wales
    Plant Preparations
    Pregnancy
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vitamin B Complex
    Vitamin D
    Vitamins
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26490392

    Citation

    Shand, Antonia W., et al. "Dietary Vitamin, Mineral and Herbal Supplement Use: a Cross-sectional Survey of Before and During Pregnancy Use in Sydney, Australia." The Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, vol. 56, no. 2, 2016, pp. 154-61.
    Shand AW, Walls M, Chatterjee R, et al. Dietary vitamin, mineral and herbal supplement use: a cross-sectional survey of before and during pregnancy use in Sydney, Australia. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2016;56(2):154-61.
    Shand, A. W., Walls, M., Chatterjee, R., Nassar, N., & Khambalia, A. Z. (2016). Dietary vitamin, mineral and herbal supplement use: a cross-sectional survey of before and during pregnancy use in Sydney, Australia. The Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 56(2), pp. 154-61. doi:10.1111/ajo.12414.
    Shand AW, et al. Dietary Vitamin, Mineral and Herbal Supplement Use: a Cross-sectional Survey of Before and During Pregnancy Use in Sydney, Australia. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2016;56(2):154-61. PubMed PMID: 26490392.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary vitamin, mineral and herbal supplement use: a cross-sectional survey of before and during pregnancy use in Sydney, Australia. AU - Shand,Antonia W, AU - Walls,Mariyam, AU - Chatterjee,Rahul, AU - Nassar,Natasha, AU - Khambalia,Amina Z, Y1 - 2015/10/22/ PY - 2015/02/23/received PY - 2015/09/11/accepted PY - 2015/10/23/entrez PY - 2015/10/23/pubmed PY - 2017/1/12/medline KW - dietary supplements KW - multivitamins KW - pregnancy KW - vitamins SP - 154 EP - 61 JF - The Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecology JO - Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol VL - 56 IS - 2 N2 - AIM: To describe the use of dietary vitamin, mineral and herbal supplements before and during pregnancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pregnant women attending for antenatal care at two tertiary Sydney hospitals between January and March 2014 completed an anonymous survey. Information on general maternal and pregnancy characteristics and the use of dietary and herbal supplements, including type, duration and sources of information, was collected. Frequency and contingency tabulations were performed. RESULTS: A total of 612 women agreed to participate (91% response rate). Of 589 women included in the analysis, mean gestational age at the time of survey was 28.5 weeks (SD 8.3), 55% had no children, and 67% were tertiary-educated. Overall, 62.9% of women reported taking a multivitamin (MV) and/or folic acid (FA) supplement in the 3 months prepregnancy, and 97.5% took a MV and/or FA in the first trimester. At the time of the survey, 93.8% of women were taking at least one supplement (median 2, range 1-13). During pregnancy, 79.1% of women were taking MVs, including 59.2% taking MV only and 19.9% taking MV and FA. The five most common supplements outside of a MV were FA (31%), iron (30%), vitamin D (23%), calcium (13%) and fish oil (12%). Reported herbal supplement rates were low. CONCLUSION: Folic acid, MVs and other supplements use during and prepregnancy is relatively high, although prepregnancy FA supplementation rates could still be improved. Further research on the actual dosages and dietary intakes consumed is needed to examine whether pregnant women have adequate intake of nutrients, regardless of supplement use. SN - 1479-828X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26490392/Dietary_vitamin_mineral_and_herbal_supplement_use:_a_cross_sectional_survey_of_before_and_during_pregnancy_use_in_Sydney_Australia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ajo.12414 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -