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Maternal drug use and risk of childhood nonlymphoblastic leukemia among offspring. An epidemiologic investigation implicating marijuana (a report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group).
Cancer. 1989 May 15; 63(10):1904-11.C

Abstract

The Childrens Cancer Study Group conducted a case-control study designed to assess in utero and postnatal exposures in children with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL). Analyses were performed for reported maternal use of medications and drugs in the year preceding and during the index pregnancy of the 204 case-control pairs. An 11-fold risk (P = 0.003) was found for maternal use of mind-altering drugs just prior to or during the index pregnancy. Compared with ANLL cases not exposed to marijuana, exposed cases were significantly younger at diagnosis of ANLL (P less than 0.01) and were more often of the myelomonocytic and monocytic subtypes (P less than 0.01). Use of antinausea medication for more than 11 weeks was also associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of 2.81 and a dose-response relationship was noted (P = 0.05 for trend). These results suggest that maternal drug use of marijuana may have an etiologic role in childhood ANLL and may be specific for morphologically defined subgroups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Health Sciences Center, Minneapolis.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2649219

Citation

Robison, L L., et al. "Maternal Drug Use and Risk of Childhood Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia Among Offspring. an Epidemiologic Investigation Implicating Marijuana (a Report From the Childrens Cancer Study Group)." Cancer, vol. 63, no. 10, 1989, pp. 1904-11.
Robison LL, Buckley JD, Daigle AE, et al. Maternal drug use and risk of childhood nonlymphoblastic leukemia among offspring. An epidemiologic investigation implicating marijuana (a report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group). Cancer. 1989;63(10):1904-11.
Robison, L. L., Buckley, J. D., Daigle, A. E., Wells, R., Benjamin, D., Arthur, D. C., & Hammond, G. D. (1989). Maternal drug use and risk of childhood nonlymphoblastic leukemia among offspring. An epidemiologic investigation implicating marijuana (a report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group). Cancer, 63(10), 1904-11.
Robison LL, et al. Maternal Drug Use and Risk of Childhood Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia Among Offspring. an Epidemiologic Investigation Implicating Marijuana (a Report From the Childrens Cancer Study Group). Cancer. 1989 May 15;63(10):1904-11. PubMed PMID: 2649219.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal drug use and risk of childhood nonlymphoblastic leukemia among offspring. An epidemiologic investigation implicating marijuana (a report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group). AU - Robison,L L, AU - Buckley,J D, AU - Daigle,A E, AU - Wells,R, AU - Benjamin,D, AU - Arthur,D C, AU - Hammond,G D, PY - 1989/5/15/pubmed PY - 1989/5/15/medline PY - 1989/5/15/entrez SP - 1904 EP - 11 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 63 IS - 10 N2 - The Childrens Cancer Study Group conducted a case-control study designed to assess in utero and postnatal exposures in children with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL). Analyses were performed for reported maternal use of medications and drugs in the year preceding and during the index pregnancy of the 204 case-control pairs. An 11-fold risk (P = 0.003) was found for maternal use of mind-altering drugs just prior to or during the index pregnancy. Compared with ANLL cases not exposed to marijuana, exposed cases were significantly younger at diagnosis of ANLL (P less than 0.01) and were more often of the myelomonocytic and monocytic subtypes (P less than 0.01). Use of antinausea medication for more than 11 weeks was also associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of 2.81 and a dose-response relationship was noted (P = 0.05 for trend). These results suggest that maternal drug use of marijuana may have an etiologic role in childhood ANLL and may be specific for morphologically defined subgroups. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2649219/Maternal_drug_use_and_risk_of_childhood_nonlymphoblastic_leukemia_among_offspring__An_epidemiologic_investigation_implicating_marijuana__a_report_from_the_Childrens_Cancer_Study_Group__ L2 - https://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/1332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -