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Risks go beyond the violence: Association between intimate partner violence, mental illness, and substance abuse among females admitted to a rural Level I trauma center.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015 Nov; 79(5):709-14; discussion 715-6.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant cause of intentional injury among women but remains underrecognized, and its relationship to other risk factors for all-cause injury remains poorly defined. This study aimed to assess IPV and its association with alcohol abuse, illicit substance use, selected mental illnesses, and other risk factors for injury.

METHODS

This is a cross-sectional study of prospectively collected data among adult females admitted to a rural, Level I trauma center. Well-validated instruments assessed IPV, substance abuse, and mental illness. Bivariate relationships were assessed with χ, odds ratios, and t test analyses.

RESULTS

Eighty-one women were enrolled; 51% reported lifetime IPV, and 31% reported past-year IPV. Both groups were significantly more likely to have a mental illness than those without a history of IPV. Those reporting lifetime IPV exposure were significantly more likely to report illicit substance use, and past-year IPV was associated with alcohol abuse (28% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.01). Participants reporting past-year IPV were significantly more likely to have a partner possessing a firearm (40% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.005).

CONCLUSION

The experience of lifetime and past-year IPV among women at a Level I, rural trauma center was high, and it was significantly associated with mental illness, substance abuse, and high-risk scenarios for intentional injury including firearm ownership by a significant other. These findings inform the potential value of IPV screening and intervention and suggest that IPV, mental illness, and substance abuse should be considered associated entities in prevention and recidivism reduction efforts in the female trauma population.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

Prognostic study, level II; therapeutic study, level III.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Division of General Surgery (A.B.H.), Department of Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; and Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care (E.T., B.W., M.B.), Department of General Surgery, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, South Carolina.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26496095

Citation

Hink, Ashley B., et al. "Risks Go Beyond the Violence: Association Between Intimate Partner Violence, Mental Illness, and Substance Abuse Among Females Admitted to a Rural Level I Trauma Center." The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, vol. 79, no. 5, 2015, pp. 709-14; discussion 715-6.
Hink AB, Toschlog E, Waibel B, et al. Risks go beyond the violence: Association between intimate partner violence, mental illness, and substance abuse among females admitted to a rural Level I trauma center. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015;79(5):709-14; discussion 715-6.
Hink, A. B., Toschlog, E., Waibel, B., & Bard, M. (2015). Risks go beyond the violence: Association between intimate partner violence, mental illness, and substance abuse among females admitted to a rural Level I trauma center. The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, 79(5), 709-14; discussion 715-6. https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000856
Hink AB, et al. Risks Go Beyond the Violence: Association Between Intimate Partner Violence, Mental Illness, and Substance Abuse Among Females Admitted to a Rural Level I Trauma Center. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015;79(5):709-14; discussion 715-6. PubMed PMID: 26496095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risks go beyond the violence: Association between intimate partner violence, mental illness, and substance abuse among females admitted to a rural Level I trauma center. AU - Hink,Ashley B, AU - Toschlog,Eric, AU - Waibel,Brett, AU - Bard,Michael, PY - 2015/10/27/entrez PY - 2015/10/27/pubmed PY - 2016/4/9/medline SP - 709-14; discussion 715-6 JF - The journal of trauma and acute care surgery JO - J Trauma Acute Care Surg VL - 79 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant cause of intentional injury among women but remains underrecognized, and its relationship to other risk factors for all-cause injury remains poorly defined. This study aimed to assess IPV and its association with alcohol abuse, illicit substance use, selected mental illnesses, and other risk factors for injury. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of prospectively collected data among adult females admitted to a rural, Level I trauma center. Well-validated instruments assessed IPV, substance abuse, and mental illness. Bivariate relationships were assessed with χ, odds ratios, and t test analyses. RESULTS: Eighty-one women were enrolled; 51% reported lifetime IPV, and 31% reported past-year IPV. Both groups were significantly more likely to have a mental illness than those without a history of IPV. Those reporting lifetime IPV exposure were significantly more likely to report illicit substance use, and past-year IPV was associated with alcohol abuse (28% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.01). Participants reporting past-year IPV were significantly more likely to have a partner possessing a firearm (40% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: The experience of lifetime and past-year IPV among women at a Level I, rural trauma center was high, and it was significantly associated with mental illness, substance abuse, and high-risk scenarios for intentional injury including firearm ownership by a significant other. These findings inform the potential value of IPV screening and intervention and suggest that IPV, mental illness, and substance abuse should be considered associated entities in prevention and recidivism reduction efforts in the female trauma population. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level II; therapeutic study, level III. SN - 2163-0763 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26496095/Risks_go_beyond_the_violence:_Association_between_intimate_partner_violence_mental_illness_and_substance_abuse_among_females_admitted_to_a_rural_Level_I_trauma_center_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000856 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -