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Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: The Hisayama Study.
J Am Geriatr Soc 2015; 63(11):2332-9JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To clarify the association between midlife and late-life smoking and risk of dementia.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

The Hisayama Study, Japan.

PARTICIPANTS

Japanese community-dwellers without dementia aged 65 to 84 (mean age 72) followed for 17 years (1988-2005) (N = 754), 619 of whom had participated in a health examination conducted in 1973-74 (mean age, 57) and were included in the midlife analysis.

MEASUREMENTS

The risk estimates of smoking status on the development of dementia were computed using a Cox proportional hazards model.

RESULTS

During follow-up, 252 subjects developed all-cause dementia; 143 had Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 76 had vascular dementia (VaD). In late life, the multivariable-adjusted risk of all-cause dementia was significantly greater in current smokers than in never smokers; similar associations were seen for all-cause dementia, AD, and VaD in midlife current smokers. Meanwhile, no significant association was observed between past smoking and risk of any type of dementia in late or midlife. Multivariable analysis showed that smokers in midlife and late life had significantly greater risks than lifelong nonsmokers of all-cause dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.49-3.49), AD (aHR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.09-3.61), and VaD (aHR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.34-6.20). Such associations were not observed for midlife smokers who quit smoking in late life.

CONCLUSION

Persistent smoking from mid- to late life is a significant risk factor for dementia and its subtypes in the general Japanese population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Department of Center for Cohort Studies, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Department of Center for Cohort Studies, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Department of Center for Cohort Studies, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Department of Center for Cohort Studies, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26503243

Citation

Ohara, Tomoyuki, et al. "Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: the Hisayama Study." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 63, no. 11, 2015, pp. 2332-9.
Ohara T, Ninomiya T, Hata J, et al. Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: The Hisayama Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015;63(11):2332-9.
Ohara, T., Ninomiya, T., Hata, J., Ozawa, M., Yoshida, D., Mukai, N., ... Kiyohara, Y. (2015). Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: The Hisayama Study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 63(11), pp. 2332-9. doi:10.1111/jgs.13794.
Ohara T, et al. Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: the Hisayama Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015;63(11):2332-9. PubMed PMID: 26503243.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Midlife and Late-Life Smoking and Risk of Dementia in the Community: The Hisayama Study. AU - Ohara,Tomoyuki, AU - Ninomiya,Toshiharu, AU - Hata,Jun, AU - Ozawa,Mio, AU - Yoshida,Daigo, AU - Mukai,Naoko, AU - Nagata,Masaharu, AU - Iwaki,Toru, AU - Kitazono,Takanari, AU - Kanba,Shigenobu, AU - Kiyohara,Yutaka, Y1 - 2015/10/27/ PY - 2015/10/28/entrez PY - 2015/10/28/pubmed PY - 2016/3/15/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - cohort studies KW - dementia KW - smoking KW - vascular dementia SP - 2332 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 63 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To clarify the association between midlife and late-life smoking and risk of dementia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Hisayama Study, Japan. PARTICIPANTS: Japanese community-dwellers without dementia aged 65 to 84 (mean age 72) followed for 17 years (1988-2005) (N = 754), 619 of whom had participated in a health examination conducted in 1973-74 (mean age, 57) and were included in the midlife analysis. MEASUREMENTS: The risk estimates of smoking status on the development of dementia were computed using a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: During follow-up, 252 subjects developed all-cause dementia; 143 had Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 76 had vascular dementia (VaD). In late life, the multivariable-adjusted risk of all-cause dementia was significantly greater in current smokers than in never smokers; similar associations were seen for all-cause dementia, AD, and VaD in midlife current smokers. Meanwhile, no significant association was observed between past smoking and risk of any type of dementia in late or midlife. Multivariable analysis showed that smokers in midlife and late life had significantly greater risks than lifelong nonsmokers of all-cause dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.49-3.49), AD (aHR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.09-3.61), and VaD (aHR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.34-6.20). Such associations were not observed for midlife smokers who quit smoking in late life. CONCLUSION: Persistent smoking from mid- to late life is a significant risk factor for dementia and its subtypes in the general Japanese population. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26503243/Midlife_and_Late_Life_Smoking_and_Risk_of_Dementia_in_the_Community:_The_Hisayama_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13794 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -