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Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: A Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials.
Behav Neurol. 2015; 2015:545917.BN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to begin to explore whether the beneficial auditory neural effects of early music training persist throughout life and influence age-related changes in neurophysiological processing of sound.

DESIGN

Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) elicited by harmonic tone complexes were examined, including P1-N1-P2, mismatch negativity (MMN), and P3a.

STUDY SAMPLE

Data from older adult musicians (n = 8) and nonmusicians (n = 8) (ages 55-70 years) were compared to previous data from young adult musicians (n = 40) and nonmusicians (n = 20) (ages 18-33 years).

RESULTS

P1-N1-P2 amplitudes and latencies did not differ between older adult musicians and nonmusicians; however, MMN and P3a latencies for harmonic tone deviances were earlier for older musicians than older nonmusicians. Comparisons of P1-N1-P2, MMN, and P3a components between older and young adult musicians and nonmusicians suggest that P1 and P2 latencies are significantly affected by age, but not musicianship, while MMN and P3a appear to be more sensitive to effects of musicianship than aging.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings support beneficial influences of musicianship on central auditory function and suggest a positive interaction between aging and musicianship on the auditory neural system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, 140 7th Street S, DAV 116, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA.Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida Tampa, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33621, USA.Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida Tampa, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33621, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26504354

Citation

O'Brien, Jennifer L., et al. "Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: a Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials." Behavioural Neurology, vol. 2015, 2015, p. 545917.
O'Brien JL, Nikjeh DA, Lister JJ. Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: A Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials. Behav Neurol. 2015;2015:545917.
O'Brien, J. L., Nikjeh, D. A., & Lister, J. J. (2015). Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: A Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials. Behavioural Neurology, 2015, 545917. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/545917
O'Brien JL, Nikjeh DA, Lister JJ. Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: a Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials. Behav Neurol. 2015;2015:545917. PubMed PMID: 26504354.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interaction of Musicianship and Aging: A Comparison of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials. AU - O'Brien,Jennifer L, AU - Nikjeh,Dee A, AU - Lister,Jennifer J, Y1 - 2015/10/04/ PY - 2015/02/15/received PY - 2015/04/11/revised PY - 2015/04/14/accepted PY - 2015/10/28/entrez PY - 2015/10/28/pubmed PY - 2016/7/28/medline SP - 545917 EP - 545917 JF - Behavioural neurology JO - Behav Neurol VL - 2015 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to begin to explore whether the beneficial auditory neural effects of early music training persist throughout life and influence age-related changes in neurophysiological processing of sound. DESIGN: Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) elicited by harmonic tone complexes were examined, including P1-N1-P2, mismatch negativity (MMN), and P3a. STUDY SAMPLE: Data from older adult musicians (n = 8) and nonmusicians (n = 8) (ages 55-70 years) were compared to previous data from young adult musicians (n = 40) and nonmusicians (n = 20) (ages 18-33 years). RESULTS: P1-N1-P2 amplitudes and latencies did not differ between older adult musicians and nonmusicians; however, MMN and P3a latencies for harmonic tone deviances were earlier for older musicians than older nonmusicians. Comparisons of P1-N1-P2, MMN, and P3a components between older and young adult musicians and nonmusicians suggest that P1 and P2 latencies are significantly affected by age, but not musicianship, while MMN and P3a appear to be more sensitive to effects of musicianship than aging. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support beneficial influences of musicianship on central auditory function and suggest a positive interaction between aging and musicianship on the auditory neural system. SN - 1875-8584 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26504354/Interaction_of_Musicianship_and_Aging:_A_Comparison_of_Cortical_Auditory_Evoked_Potentials_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/545917 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -