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A comparative study of venomics of Naja naja from India and Sri Lanka, clinical manifestations and antivenomics of an Indian polyspecific antivenom.
J Proteomics. 2016 Jan 30; 132:131-43.JP

Abstract

Naja naja (Indian cobra) from Sri Lanka and India is the WHO Category 1 medically important snakes in both countries. Some antivenom produced against Indian N. naja (NNi) were less effective against Sri Lankan N. naja (NNsl). Proteomes of NNi and NNsl venoms were studied by RP-HPLC, SDS-PAGE and LC/MS/MS. Six protein families were identified in both venoms with the most abundant were the 3 finger toxins (3FTs) where cytotoxins (CTX) subtype predominated, followed by phospholipase A2, cysteine-rich venom protein, snake venom metalloproteases, venom growth factors, and protease inhibitors. Qualitative and quantitative differences in the venomics profiles were observed. Some proteins were isolated from either NNi or NNsl venom. Postsynaptic neurotoxins (NTX) were identified for the first time in NNsl venom. Thus, there are geographic intra-specific variations of venom composition of the two N. naja. The relative abundance of CTX and NTX explained well the clinical manifestations of these venoms. Antivenomics study of an Indian antivenom (Vins) showed the antibodies effectively bound all venom toxins from both snakes but more avidly to the Indian venom proteins. The lower antibody affinity towards the 'heterologous' venom was the likely cause of poor efficacy of the Indian antivenom used to treat NNsl envenoming.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Immunology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: kitisak@cri.or.th.Laboratory of Immunology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: kamolwan@cri.or.th.Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: sandani1983@gmail.com.Laboratory of Immunology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: papada@cri.or.th.Laboratory of Biochemistry, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: daranee@cri.or.th.Laboratory of Biochemistry, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: chantragan@cri.or.th.Laboratory of Immunology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210, Thailand; Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Bangkok 10210, Thailand. Electronic address: kavi.rtn.@mahidol.ac.th.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26506536

Citation

Sintiprungrat, Kitisak, et al. "A Comparative Study of Venomics of Naja Naja From India and Sri Lanka, Clinical Manifestations and Antivenomics of an Indian Polyspecific Antivenom." Journal of Proteomics, vol. 132, 2016, pp. 131-43.
Sintiprungrat K, Watcharatanyatip K, Senevirathne WD, et al. A comparative study of venomics of Naja naja from India and Sri Lanka, clinical manifestations and antivenomics of an Indian polyspecific antivenom. J Proteomics. 2016;132:131-43.
Sintiprungrat, K., Watcharatanyatip, K., Senevirathne, W. D., Chaisuriya, P., Chokchaichamnankit, D., Srisomsap, C., & Ratanabanangkoon, K. (2016). A comparative study of venomics of Naja naja from India and Sri Lanka, clinical manifestations and antivenomics of an Indian polyspecific antivenom. Journal of Proteomics, 132, 131-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.10.007
Sintiprungrat K, et al. A Comparative Study of Venomics of Naja Naja From India and Sri Lanka, Clinical Manifestations and Antivenomics of an Indian Polyspecific Antivenom. J Proteomics. 2016 Jan 30;132:131-43. PubMed PMID: 26506536.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparative study of venomics of Naja naja from India and Sri Lanka, clinical manifestations and antivenomics of an Indian polyspecific antivenom. AU - Sintiprungrat,Kitisak, AU - Watcharatanyatip,Kamolwan, AU - Senevirathne,W D S T, AU - Chaisuriya,Papada, AU - Chokchaichamnankit,Daranee, AU - Srisomsap,Chantragan, AU - Ratanabanangkoon,Kavi, Y1 - 2015/10/24/ PY - 2015/08/14/received PY - 2015/09/24/revised PY - 2015/10/08/accepted PY - 2015/10/28/entrez PY - 2015/10/28/pubmed PY - 2016/9/27/medline KW - Antibody affinity KW - Antivenomics KW - Clinical symptoms KW - Geographical variation KW - Naja naja India KW - Naja naja Sri Lanka KW - Venom proteomes SP - 131 EP - 43 JF - Journal of proteomics JO - J Proteomics VL - 132 N2 - Naja naja (Indian cobra) from Sri Lanka and India is the WHO Category 1 medically important snakes in both countries. Some antivenom produced against Indian N. naja (NNi) were less effective against Sri Lankan N. naja (NNsl). Proteomes of NNi and NNsl venoms were studied by RP-HPLC, SDS-PAGE and LC/MS/MS. Six protein families were identified in both venoms with the most abundant were the 3 finger toxins (3FTs) where cytotoxins (CTX) subtype predominated, followed by phospholipase A2, cysteine-rich venom protein, snake venom metalloproteases, venom growth factors, and protease inhibitors. Qualitative and quantitative differences in the venomics profiles were observed. Some proteins were isolated from either NNi or NNsl venom. Postsynaptic neurotoxins (NTX) were identified for the first time in NNsl venom. Thus, there are geographic intra-specific variations of venom composition of the two N. naja. The relative abundance of CTX and NTX explained well the clinical manifestations of these venoms. Antivenomics study of an Indian antivenom (Vins) showed the antibodies effectively bound all venom toxins from both snakes but more avidly to the Indian venom proteins. The lower antibody affinity towards the 'heterologous' venom was the likely cause of poor efficacy of the Indian antivenom used to treat NNsl envenoming. SN - 1876-7737 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26506536/A_comparative_study_of_venomics_of_Naja_naja_from_India_and_Sri_Lanka_clinical_manifestations_and_antivenomics_of_an_Indian_polyspecific_antivenom_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1874-3919(15)30152-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -